Thursday, May 14, 2015

5G Forum


Host: CWC

Abstract
The May 5G Forum will discuss 5G application drivers like mobile health, IoT, and multimedia, and explore challenges and opportunities in mobile analytics and security, besides looking into new radio and network architectures. The Forum will investigate what new applications and user experiences can be enabled by 5G, what requirements need to be met by 5G networks and devices, and how new innovations in 5G networks, analytics, and circuits can satisfy these requirements. Like in our November 2014 5G Forum, we will have industry leaders and experts from different industry segments, together with experts from academia, participate as speakers and panelists. We expect the audience to consist of faculty, students, and members from various industry segments. We hope the talks and panel discussions will help stimulate dialogues between application innovators and 5G technology enablers, and help shape future CWC projects and innovations in 5G.



Friday, December 12, 2014

Sampling and Reconstruction of High-Dimensional Visual Appearance

Ravi Ramamoorthi

Host: Prof. Larry Milstein & Prof. M

Abstract
Many problems in computer graphics and computer vision involve high-dimensional 3D-8D visual datasets. Real-time image synthesis with changing lighting and view is often accomplished by pre-computing the 6D light transport function (2 dimensions each for spatial position, incident lighting and viewing direction). Realistic image synthesis also often involves acquisition of appearance data from real-world objects; a BRDF (Bi-Directional Reflection Distribution Function) that measures the scattering of light at a single surface location is 4D and spatial variation and subsurface scattering involve 6D-8D functions. In computer vision, problems like lighting insensitive facial recognition similarly involve understanding the space of appearance variation across lighting and view. Since hundreds of samples may be required in each dimension, and the total size is exponential in the dimensionality, brute force acquisition or precomputation is often not even feasible.
In this talk, we describe [More...]

Bio
Ravi Ramamoorthi a professor of Computer Science and Engineering at UCSD and an affiliate in ECE. He joined the department in Jul 2014, moving from the EECS department in UC Berkeley, where he had been since January 2009. Earlier, he was on the faculty of the Computer Science Department at Columbia University since August 2002, when he received his PhD from Stanford University. He obtained his BS and MS degrees in computer science and physics from the California Institute of Technology in 1998. He is an author of more than 100 refereed publications in computer graphics and computer vision, including 50 at ACM SIGGRAPH/TOG. His research has been recognized with a half-dozen early career awards, including the ACM SIGGRAPH Significant New Researcher Award in computer graphics in 2007, and the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) for his work in physics-based computer vision in 2008. He has graduated more than 20 postdoctoral, Ph.D. and M.S. students, many [More...]


Tuesday, December 9, 2014

Mean Field Games: An Approach to Understanding Resource Sharing Systems

Srinivas Shakkottai

Host: Prof. Tara Javidi

Abstract
We will begin by discussing mean field games as a method of studying systems that have a large number of agents, and where any subset of agents has infrequent interactions. Here, agents model their opponents at any particular interaction through an assumed distribution over their action spaces, and play the best response action against this distribution. We say that the system is at MFE if this best response action turns out to be a sample drawn from the assumed distribution.

We will discuss several of our recent results in the space of MFE that occur under a repeated game framework in resource sharing networks. Here, there is a set of shared resources, and a mechanism is used during each play to allocate resources to the agents that desire them. The agents might experience positive or negative externalities due to network effects. Examples include online marketplaces, public transportation, smart grids, and P2P networks. In many of these applications, the objective will be [More...]

Bio
Srinivas Shakkottai received a PhD (2007) in Electrical Engineering, from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He was a post-doctoral scholar in Management Science and Engineering at Stanford University in 2007, and is currently an associate professor at the Dept. of ECE at Texas A&M University. Srinivas is the recipient of the Defense Threat reduction Agency Young Investigator Award (2009) and the NSF Career Award (2012), as well as research awards from Cisco (2008) and Google (2010). He also received an Outstanding Professor Award (2013) and was selected as a TEES Select Young Faculty Fellow (2014) at Texas A&M University.


Thursday, December 4, 2014

Structural Analysis and Design of Biochemical Dynamic Networks

Elisa Franco

Host: Prof. Massimo Franceschetti

Abstract
Dynamic networks are at the core of many biological functions. For instance, oscillators drive cellular rhythms, and bistable mechanisms switch on and off developmental pathways. To gain control over molecular dynamics, a variety of synthetic clocks and switches have been built in the past decades. One important challenge in their design is the uncertainty and variability of parameters such as reaction rates and concentrations. In my talk I will describe "parameter-free" methods that focus on the network structure, intended as the sign pattern of the interactions among components. In particular, I will present a structural classification of oscillators and multi stationary systems based on the exclusive or simultaneous presence of negative and positive feedback loops. I will show that these structural tools are applicable to realistic models of experimental systems, and in several cases can immediately yield analytical insights on the system capacity for a specific dynamic behavior.
Bio
Elisa Franco is an Assistant Professor in Mechanical Engineering at UC Riverside. She received a Ph.D. in control and dynamical systems from Caltech, and a Ph.D. in automation and a M.S. in power systems engineering from the University of Trieste, Italy. Her research interests are in the areas of biological feedback networks and DNA nanotechnology. She received a Hellman fellowship and a UC Regents fellowship in 2013.


Friday, October 31, 2014

Secret Communications in the Pysical Layer --- Impact of Training and Limited Channel State Information

Y.-W. Peter Hong

Host: Prof. Bhaskar Rao

Abstract
Due to the broadcast nature of the wireless medium, secrecy considerations have become increasingly important in the design of wireless communication systems. In addition to conventional cryptography-based approaches, information-theoretic studies on physical layer secrecy have demonstrated the possibility of achieving confidentiality solely through coding and signal processing techniques. However, many of these studies rely on perfect knowledge of the channel state information (CSI) at the transmitter and/or the receiver, which is not attainable in practice. In this talk, I will describe our recent studies on the impact of training and limited channel state information (CSI) on the achievable secrecy rate. First, I will talk about the impact of quantized channel feedback on the achievable secrecy rate. By considering the artificial noise assisted beamforming system, I will discuss the secrecy rate loss caused by quantized channel direction information and show the scaling of the numbe [More...]

Bio
Y.-W. Peter Hong received his B.S. degree from National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, in 1999, and his Ph.D. degree from Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, in 2005, both in electrical engineering. He joined the Institute of Communications Engineering and the Department of Electrical Engineering at National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, in Fall 2005, where he is now a Full Professor. His research interests include cooperative communications, physical layer secrecy, distributed signal processing for sensor networks, and cross-layer designs for wireless networks.
Dr. Hong received the best paper award for young authors from the IEEE IT/COM Society Taipei/Tainan chapter in 2005, the best paper award among unclassified papers in MILCOM 2005, the Junior Faculty Research Award from the College of EECS and from National Tsing Hua University in 2009 and 2010, respectively, and the Outstanding Teaching Award from the College of EECS in 2010. He also received the IEEE Communication S [More...]


Friday, October 31, 2014

How to power a pacemaker that is smaller than a grain of rice

Ada Poon

Host: Prof. Larry Milstein & Prof. M

Abstract
Miniaturized electronics, when placed inside the body, can wirelessly monitor and modulate internal activity and thus hold promise as a new class of treatments for disorders. The development of such bioelectronic medicines requires wireless interfaces that are tiny and operate deep in a complex electromagnetic environment. In this talk, I will describe a new method for electromagnetic energy transfer that exploits near-field interactions with biological tissue to wirelessly power tiny devices anywhere in the body, including the heart and the brain. I will discuss engineering and experimental challenges to realizing such interfaces, including a pacemaker that is smaller than a grain of rice and a fully internalized neuromodulation platform. These devices can act as bioelectronic medicines, capable of precisely modulating local activity that may be more effective treatments than drugs, which act globally throughout the body.
Bio
Ada Poon received her B.Eng degree from the EEE department at the University of Hong Kong and her Ph.D. degree from the EECS department at the University of California at Berkeley. Her dissertation attempted to connect information theory with electromagnetic theory so as to better understand the fundamental limit of wireless channels. Upon graduation, she spent one year at Intel as a senior research scientist building reconfigurable baseband processors. Afterwards, she joined SiBeam Inc. architecting Gigabit wireless transceivers. After two years in industries, she returned to academic and joined the faculty of the ECE department at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Since then, she has changed her research direction from wireless communications to integrated biomedical systems. In 2008, she joined the faculty of the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. She is a Terman Fellow at Stanford University. She received the Okawa Foundation Research Grant in [More...]


Thursday, October 23, 2014

MEMS Devices for Use in Tunable Filters and Nano Instrumentation

Raafat Mansour

Host: Prof. Gabriel Rebeiz

Abstract
High performance tunable RF filters are needed in communication systems to facilitate efficient utilization of the available frequency spectrum. They are also in demand in front-end receivers for suppression of interfering signals and in advanced systems concepts that self-adapt to operational and environmental requirements. The talk outlines the current status of high-Q tunable filters addressing the use of MEMS in developing such filters.
The talk will also introduce a new class of nano instrumentation that leverages the myriad economic benefits of having integrated systems with both electrical and mechanical functionality on a single-chip. This is ena- bled by a CMOS post-processing technique developed to integrate actuation, position sensing and control electronics on a single CMOS chip. In particular, the talk will present the research that is being carried out at the University of Waterloo to develop chip-scale CMOS-MEMS Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM) and Scanning Microwave Micr [More...]

Bio
Raafat Mansour is a Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering at the University of Waterloo and holds a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Micro-Nano Integrated RF Systems. He is the Founding Director of the Cen- ter for Integrated RF Engineering (CIRFE) at the University of Waterloo (www.cirfe.uwaterloo.ca).
He held an NSERC Industrial Research Chair for two terms (2001-2005) and (2006-2010). Prior to joining the University of Waterloo in January 2000, Dr. Mansour was with COM DEV Cambridge, Ontario, over the period 1986-1999, where he held various technical and management positions in COM DEV’s Corporate R&D Department.
Dr. Mansour holds 33 US and Canadian patents and has more than 350 refereed publications to his credit. He is a co-author of a book published by Wiley in 2007 on Fitters for Communication Systems and contributed 5 chapters to three other books. He served as the Chair of the Technical Program Committee of the IEEE- IMS 2012 Symposium. Dr. Mansour is a Fellow of [More...]


Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Millimeter-Wave RFIC Design: A Tutorial

Christopher Hull

Host: Prof. Gabriel Rebeiz

Abstract
Designing at millimeter wave frequencies requires a fundamentally different approach from RF design. Layout has a first-order impact on circuit performance. Contrary to traditional RF and analog design flow, in mm-wave design it is necessary to complete the layout of the fundamental building blocks prior to actual design. Only after careful extraction and modeling is complete can meaningful simulations be done. An example of this approach in a 65nm foundry will be discussed.
Bio
Christopher Hull received his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1992. He joined Rockwell Semiconductor Systems in Newport Beach, CA in 1992. In 1998 Chris joined Silicon Wave in San Diego, California, In 2001, Chris joined Innocomm Wireless, which was subsequently acquired by National Semiconductor. In May, 2003 Chris joined the Wireless Networking Group of Intel, in San Diego, California. And In June 2005, Chris moved to Hillsboro Oregon. In 2013, Chris is spent one year on international assignment in Munich, Germany to work closely with his colleges from Intel Mobile Communications on 4G cellular transceivers. He is now in Hillsboro, OR working on mm-wave design.


Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Broadband Ultra Low-Noise Superconductor/Semiconductor Interfaces for Quantum Systems

Prof. Joseph Bardin

Host: Prof. James Buckwalter

Abstract
In a number of critical scientific fields, the highest performance instrumentation exploits superconducting electronics to achieve unprecedented performance. For example, the microwave approach to quantum computing requires making return loss measurements at X-band with as few as five photons in the reflected signal. This in turn requires amplifiers with noise performance approaching the vacuum fluctuation limit, TQ = hf/2k ≈ 0.2 K. Such noise performance can only be achieved using superconducting parametric amplifiers—all demonstrated semiconductor devices have exhibited fundamental performance limits at least one order of magnitude above this limit, even when cooled to cryogenic temperatures. Recent progress in superconducting devices has created a growing interest in implementing highly scaled systems with applications including free space optical communications, radio astronomy, and quantum computing. Such systems will require high-performance semiconductor interface circuitry [More...]

Bio
Joseph Bardin received the BS, MS, and PhD degrees in Electrical Engineering from UCSB, UCLA, and Caltech in 2003, 2005, and 2009, respectively. From 2003-2005, he was with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. In 2010, he joined the department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Massachusetts Amherst as an Assistant Professor. His research group explores a broad range of topics in the field of high-frequency circuit design ranging from device modeling to the implementation of sophisticated integrated circuits. He is the recipient of a 2011 DARPA Young Faculty Award and a 2014 NSF CAREER Award.


Tuesday, August 12, 2014

New tricks in Analog to Digital Conversion

Prof. Michael P. Flynn

Host: Prof. Ian Galton

Abstract
Although analog-to-digital converters have existed for more than 70 years, new ADC techniques continue to emerge. ADC architectures are evolving to deliver higher performance and also to take advantage of improved process performance. This presentation will discuss three new ADC architectures. A noise-shaping scheme shapes comparator noise and quantization noise in a SAR ADC. A bandpass ADC architecture enables efficient IF digitization. A new ring amplifier structure improves the resilience and efficiency of the ring amplifier architecture.
Bio
Michael P. Flynn was born in Cork, Ireland. He received his Ph.D. degree from Carnegie Mellon University in 1995. He was with National Semiconductor in Santa Clara, CA, from 1993 to 1995. From 1995 to 1997 he was a Member of Technical Staff with Texas Instruments, DSP R&D lab, Dallas, TX. During the four-year period from 1997 to 2001, he was with Parthus Technologies, Cork. Dr. Flynn joined the University of Michigan in 2001 and is currently professor.
Michael Flynn is a 2008 Guggenheim Fellow. He received the 2011 Education Excellence Award and the 2010 College of Engineering Ted Kennedy Family Team Excellence Award from the University of Michigan College from Engineering. He received the 2005-2006 Outstanding Achievement Award from the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan. He received the NSF Early Career Award in 2004. He received the 1992-93 IEEE Solid-State Circuits Pre-doctoral Fellowship. He is Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Jour [More...]


Friday, August 8, 2014

Power Amplifiers for Energy Efficient and Wideband Mobile Communication Applications – Research Directions at Chalmers University

Prof. Christian Fager

Host: Prof. Peter Asbeck

Abstract
The need to improve capacity and energy consumption in existing and future mobile communication systems is driving intense research on how to improve the bandwidth and efficiency of mobile and base station transmitters. This presentation will give an overview of the recent research performed at Chalmers University in this area, ranging from new power amplifier circuits to advanced signal processing and system level analysis techniques. A variety of innovative circuit design techniques will thereby be presented, including wideband and efficient Doherty-, outphasing-, and varactor based dynamic load modulation power amplifier architectures. Different signal processing techniques tailored for digital pre-distortion linearization of these architectures will also be outlined, including new measurement techniques for real-time adaptation of such methods. Finally, a comprehensive method for system level analysis of antenna array transmitters will be presented and its potential for use in deve [More...]

Bio
Christian Fager received the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Microwave Electronics, from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, in 1998 and 2003, respectively. He is currently an Associate Professor and project leader in the GigaHertz Centre at the Microwave Electronics Laboratory. In 2002 he received the Best Student Paper Award at the IEEE International Microwave Symposium. His research interests are in the areas of large signal transistor modeling and high efficiency power amplifier architectures.


Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Flexible Fork-Join Networks

Ramtin Pedarsani

Host: Prof. Tara Javidi

Abstract
We consider a general flexible fork-join processing network, in which jobs are modeled as directed acyclic graphs with nodes representing tasks, and edges representing precedence constraints among tasks. Both servers and tasks are flexible in the sense that each task can be processed by several servers, which in turn can serve multiple task types. The system model is motivated by the problem of efficient scheduling of both sequential and parallel tasks in a flexible processing environment, which arises in many application areas such as data centers. A major challenge in designing efficient scheduling policies is the lack of reliable estimates of system parameters such as arrival and/or service rates. We call a policy robust if it does not depend on system parameters such as arrival and service rates. In this talk, we propose a provably throughput-optimal robust scheduling policy for the flexible fork-join network model.
Bio
Ramtin Pedarsani received his B.Sc. in electrical engineering in 2009 from University of Tehran. He obtained his M.Sc. in communication systems from EPFL in 2011. He is currently a third-year Ph.D. candidate at UC Berkeley advised by Jean Walrand. His current research emphasis is on queuing networks and data center scheduling. During his master studies, he was working on construction of polar codes under the supervision of Emre Telatar. Ramtin Pedarsani received the Rafael Rodriguez fellowship from UC Berkeley in 2011 and the faculty of engineering (FOE) award for best undergraduate student of University of Tehran in college of engineering, in 2009.


Friday, June 13, 2014

Energy-Efficient Electrical Serial Link Transceiver Architectures

Samuel Palermo

Host: Professor James Buckwalter

Abstract
In order to meet the inter-chip bandwidth demands of future systems and comply with limited processor power budgets, both chip-to-chip data rates and I/O energy efficiency must improve. This is a significant challenge for electrical interconnect architectures, which currently offer the lowest-cost solutions, as the frequency-dependent loss of conventional electrical channels prohibit significant data rate scaling without efficient equalizer circuits. A promising approach to improve I/O efficiency involves leveraging dynamic power management techniques, either by scaling individual channels’ data rate or by operating the channels in a burst-mode manner based on system bandwidth demand. In order to realize this, low-power clocking architectures that allow for scalable data rate operation and circuits with rapid power-up/down capabilities are required. This talk will provide an overview of recent advances in electrical serial link transceiver circuits that improve high data rate I/O ene [More...]

Bio
Samuel Palermo (S’98-M’07) received the B.S. and M.S. degree in electrical engineering from Texas A&M University, College Station, TX in 1997 and 1999, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from Stanford University, Stanford, CA in 2007.


From 1999 to 2000, he was with Texas Instruments, Dallas, TX, where he worked on the design of mixed-signal integrated circuits for high-speed serial data communication. From 2006 to 2008, he was with Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, OR, where he worked on high-speed optical and electrical I/O architectures. In 2009, he joined the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department of Texas A&M University where he is currently an assistant professor. His research interests include high-speed electrical and optical links, clock recovery systems, and sensor circuits.


Dr. Palermo is a recipient of a 2013 NSF-CAREER award. He is a member of Eta Kappa Nu and IEEE. He currently serves as an associate editor for IEEE Transactions [More...]


Wednesday, June 4, 2014

Principal Component Analysis with Structured Factors

Andrea Montanari

Host: Professor Massimo Franceschett

Abstract
Many modern data sets are naturally presented as data matrices. Examples include recommendation systems (with rows corresponding to products, and columns to customers), hyper-spectral imaging (with rows corresponding to pixels, and columns to frequencies), gene expression data (with rows corresponding to patients, and columns to genes). Principal component analysis aims at reducing the dimensionality of such datasets by projecting samples in a few directions of maximum variability. The principal vectors are often interpretable and convey important information about the data. This in turn imposes constraints on these vectors: for instance, in some cases the principal directions are known to be non-negative or sparse. Substantial work has been devoted to exploiting these constraints to improve statistical accuracy. Despite this, it is still poorly understood whether and when this is a good idea. I will discuss three examples that illustrate the mathematical richness of this problem, [More...]

Bio
Andrea Montanari received a Laurea degree in Physics in 1997, and a Ph. D. in Theoretical Physics in 2001 (both from Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa, Italy). He has been post-doctoral fellow at Laboratoire de Physique Théorique de l'Ecole Normale Supérieure (LPTENS), Paris, France, and the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute, Berkeley, USA. Since 2002 he is Chargé de Recherche (with Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, CNRS) at LPTENS. In September 2006 he joined Stanford University as a faculty, and since 2010 he is Associate Professor in the Departments of Electrical Engineering and Statistics.
He was co-awarded the ACM SIGMETRICS best paper award in 2008. He received the CNRS bronze medal for theoretical physics in 2006, the National Science Foundation CAREER award in 2008, and the Okawa Foundation Research Grant in 2013.


Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Plug and play operation of microgrids: Objectives and Strategies

Florian Dörfler

Host: Professor Massimo Franceschett

Abstract
Microgrids are low-voltage electrical distribution networks, heterogeneously composed of distributed generation, storage, load, and managed autonomously from the larger transmission network. Modeled after the hierarchical control architecture of power transmission systems, a layering of primary, secondary, and tertiary control has become the standard operation paradigm for microgrids. Despite this superficial similarity, the control objectives in microgrids across these three layers are varied and ambitious, and they must be achieved while allowing for robust plug-and-play operation and maximal flexibility, without hierarchical decision making and time-scale separations. In this seminar, we explore control strategies for these three layers and illuminate some possibly-unexpected connections and dependencies among them. We build upon a first-principle model and different decentralized primary control strategies such as droop, quadratic droop, and virtual oscillator control. We motivate [More...]

Bio
Florian Dörfler is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of California Los Angeles. He received a Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California at Santa Barbara in 2013 and a Diploma degree in Engineering Cybernetics from the University of Stuttgart in 2008. He is affiliated with the Center for Nonlinear Studies at the Los Alamos National Laboratories.


Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Piezoelectric Microresonator Devices: Enabling Frequency Agile and Adaptive Radios

Roy H. Olsson III

Host: Professor Gabriel Rebeiz

Abstract
The radio frequency (RF) spectrum is becoming increasingly crowded, with more users accessing an increasing amount of bandwidth. As a result, wireless handsets are experiencing a rapid increase in the number of frequencies and standards supported on a single platform. While the other components that comprise the RF front-end such as amplifiers, mixers and switches are experiencing higher levels of co-integration, a modern cellular radio includes a large and increasing number of discrete filter dies to accommodate the growing number of RF bands. A miniature and adaptive filter technology that supports many wireless standards on a single chip is needed to continue the increase in wireless data and functionality seen over the past decade.


Piezoelectric microresonators are an enabling technology for increasing adaptability, improving performance and miniaturization of RF devices. This talk will present an overview of piezoelectric microsystems research at Sandia National Laboratorie [More...]

Bio
Roy H. Olsson III is a Principal Electronics Engineer in the MEMS Technologies Department at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM. He received B.S. degrees (Summa Cum Laude) in electrical engineering and in computer engineering from West Virginia University in 1999 and the MS and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor in 2001 and 2004.


At Sandia Roy has lead research programs in the areas of piezoelectric micro-devices such as RF microresonators, oscillators and filters, inertial sensors, phononic crystals and acousto-optic modulators. Roy has co-authored 27 journal and 69 conference papers and holds 16 patents in the area of MEMS and microelectronics. Roy won 1st place and best overall paper at the 2002 Design Automation Conference Student Design Contest. Roy was the recipient of the Sandia Up and Coming Innovator Award in 2011 and a 2013 Sandia Inventor Award. Together with the Sandia Microresonator Research Team, he was a [More...]


Friday, May 23, 2014

How to survive in the fiercely competitive Consumer-Electronics Industry

Osama Shanaa

Host: Professor Gabriel Rebeiz

Abstract
The “consumer-electronics” is pretty much a self-destructive industry. OEM/ODMs demand more features and higher performance out of ICs and are unwilling to pay extra for that. Meanwhile, IC-makers compete against each other to make their designs better by packing more features into an IC, but more importantly make their solutions cheaper going from one generation to the next. This is quite different from other industries, for example the fashion industry, where the price goes up going from one generation to the next. Such unfortunate business model puts so much strain on IC designers to do virtually the impossible and puts their innovative abilities to the test. In fact, with most semiconductor companies going fabless using same foundries such as TSMC or UMC, there is no more differentiating advantage from process technology alone. As a result, differentiation now comes mostly from innovation and true ingenuity. This talk walks the audience through design challenges and considerati [More...]

Bio
Osama Shanaa: (IEEE SM’94, M’01, S’03) is a Senior Technical Director at Mediatek USA Inc. He received his BSc. degree in electrical engineering with high honor from University of Jordan in 1992, the M.S.EE degree from Portland State University in 1996 and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 2001. Between 1995-1997 he held various IC design positions at Radio Comm. Corp., Portland OR, National Semiconductor, Santa Clara CA, and later from 1998 and early 2008 he was with Maxim Integrated Products, Sunnyvale CA, where he lead many successful RF wireless designs for PCS, CDMA, WCDMA, WLAN and WiMax. He has been with Mediatek since 2008 as a Sr. Technical Director for analog and RF circuit design, where he is responsible for various CMOS RF SoC developments for both cellular and connectivity. In Fall 2005 he was a visiting professor at the University of California at Berkeley where he taught an advanced circuit design class for wireless communicatio [More...]


Wednesday, May 7, 2014

Quantization and Encoding of Linear Measurements

Rayan Saab

Host: Professor Massimo Franceschett

Abstract
In the digital era, to acquire a signal one must not only sample (or measure) it but also quantize (or digitize) the measurements. One popular family of quantization methods, known for its robustness to errors and ability to act progressively on the measurements is Sigma-Delta quantization. In this talk, we discuss some recent results on the Sigma-Delta quantization of generalized linear measurements, both in the frame setting (where one has more measurements than the ambient dimension of the signal) and in the compressed sensing setting (where one has fewer measurements, but the signal is sparse).


We also show that, in the frame setting, a simple encoding consisting of a discrete random embedding of the Sigma-Delta bit-stream yields near-optimal rate distortion performance with high probability. Moreover, this encoding allows efficient linear reconstruction. We show that these result holds for a wide variety of frames, including smooth frames and random frames.

Bio
Dr. Saab earned his Ph.D. in 2010 from the University of British Columbia. Following graduation Dr. Saab took a Visiting Assistant Professorship at Duke University where he was supported by a two-year Banting Postdoctoral Fellowship, one of the most prestigious postdoctoral fellowships awarded by Canada. Dr. Saab is an expert on mathematical signal processing, including compressed sensing and quantization; his research has been published in an unusually wide range of venues, ranging from professional mathematical journals to journals specializing in such diverse areas as neural transmission and geophysics. Dr. Saab's philosophy and experiences related to diversity show great promise of contribution to diversity at UCSD. While at Duke University, although it was not required of his fellowship, Dr. Saab asked to teach one class, Math 108: Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations and received excellent student evaluations. He also co-taught an advanced course on 'Sigma Delta quantiz [More...]


Monday, May 5, 2014

Recent Advances in Passive Sun Trackers

Dr. Leo D. DiDomenico

Host: Professor Gabriel Rebeiz

Abstract
In this presentation I will discuss the advantages and limitation of the current state-of-the-art in solar trackers and why advanced sun tracking is critically important to improving the performance and cost of solar energy systems. Then I show how to effectively create a low-mass, compact, robust and low-cost “sunlight controlled phased array antenna” using a specific type of easy-to-manufacture photonic crystal system. This allows passive tracking of the sun from horizon-to-horizon, but without the need for any electronics or mechanical motion of any kind, while simultaneously increasing the total solar energy collected from solar arrays on a fixed area by typically more than 100%. An overview of the underlying electromagnetic theory is provided. Applications to solar powered air / ground / sea vehicles, power plants and other areas are discussed.

Bio
Dr. Leo D. DiDomenico - Currently the CEO of a Silicon Valley start-up called Giant Leap Technologies and has been involved in developing new solar technologies since 2005. Prior to becoming CEO, he worked at NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab, where he was the principle investigator of a DARPA sponsored program in the use of photonic crystal materials for high-power solar-pumped lasers. He also was involved in radar remote sensing technology development. Prior to that he worked for the U.S. Army Research Labs in as researcher in phased arrays and wide bandwidth antennas. Leo earned his Ph.D. in Electrial Engineering from the Radiation Laboratory at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor in 1999.


Thursday, May 1, 2014

Electrical contacts for devices: Contemporary examples based on wide bandgap semiconductors, transparent conductors, and organic electronics

Lisa M. Porter

Host: Professor Charles Tu

Abstract
Electrical contacts to semiconductors are vital, but often disregarded, components of all electronic and optoelectronic devices. In the most basic sense, a contact needs to function as either a low-resistance (ohmic) conduit for current or as a rectifying (Schottky) contact, which requires control of the interfacial Schottky barrier; this control can be difficult for many semiconductors and for certain doping types (n-type or p-type). Furthermore, the versatility of modern electronics often requires that contacts serve multiple functions; for example as both Schottky diodes and chemical catalysts in semiconductor-based chemical sensors, and as both low-resistance ohmic contacts and transparent electrodes in photovoltaics. In this presentation I will discuss the science and technology of electrical contacts for a number of contemporary applications: including organic electronics, wide bandgap semiconductor-based chemical sensors, and transparent conductors, while drawing from materials [More...]

Bio
Lisa Porter is a Professor in the Department of Materials Science & Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She joined the faculty as an assistant professor in 1997 and was promoted to Associate Professor in 2001 and Professor in 2006. She received her degrees in materials science & engineering from Cornell University (B.S.) and N.C. State University (Ph.D.). Her professional awards include an NSF Career Award, the Philbrook Engineering Prize, and a Swedish Research Council Visiting Professorship. With a focus on the fabrication, processing, and characterization of semiconductor devices and associated interfaces, her group is actively investigating a range of materials including pure metal and metal-alloy films, wide band-gap semiconductors, nanotubes and nanowires, organic semiconducting polymers, and 2D semiconducting films. She recently served as Program Chair and Division Chair of the Electronic Materials and Processing Division of AVS and currently [More...]


Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Detecting Emotional Contagion in Massive Social Networks

Lorenzo Coviello

Host: Professor Massimo Franceschett

Abstract
Online social networks are an invaluable source of data for the study of social phenomena related to influence and contagion. In most cases, running large-scale experiments on these online platforms is infeasible (e.g., it requires close collaboration with private companies, or the company wants to offer an homogeneous experience to all its users) or undesirable (for the potential interaction of users assigned to different experimental treatments), and researchers have to rely on observational data, which poses inherent difficulties in assessing causality.


We propose a model to detect and quantify emotional contagion in a social network using observational data, and we validate it on a corpus of billions of status updates posted by Facebook users over a period of three years.


To circumvent the problem of reciprocal causality between the emotional state of social contacts or "friends" - due to the feedback present in a model of emotional contagion - we recur to an instrumental [More...]

Bio
Lorenzo Coviello is a PhD student in the department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UC San Diego, advised by Prof. Massimo Franceschetti. His research interest is in social networks modeling (human cooperation and distributed computation over networks) and in computational social science (analysis of large data sets from online social networks, and statistical modeling). His goal is to answer questions arising from different fields (computation, social and health sciences, economics) using a blend of data analysis, algorithm analysis, game theory, and mathematics.


Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Load Balancing in Large Graphs

Venkat Anantharam

Host: Professor Massimo Franceschett

Abstract
We consider load balancing on a large graph. Each edge has a unit of load that it wishes to distribute between its nodes in the most balanced way. For infinite graphs the corresponding load balancing problem exhibits nonuniqueness, related with role of boundary conditions in statistical mechanical models. Nevertheless, we are able to extend the notion of balanced loads from large finite graphs to their local weak limits, using the concept of unimodularity. The result applies in particular to the Erdos-Renyi model, where it settles a conjecture of Hajek (1990). Our proof is a new illustration of the objective method described by Aldous and Steele (2004). All the necessary background from the machinery of local weak convergence that is needed will be developed during the talk. This machinery provides a way to study many problems of applied interest in large networks beyond just the load balancing problem that will be the focus of this talk. It is therefore valuable to familiarize one [More...]

Bio
Venkat Anantharam is on the faculty of the EECS Department at the University of California, Berkeley. He received the Philips India Medal and the President of India Gold Medal from IIT Madras in 1980 and an NSF Presidential Young Investigator award in 1988. He is a corecipient of the 1998 Prize Paper Award of the IEEE Information Theory Society, and a corecipient of the 2000 Stephen O. Rice Prize Paper Award of the IEEE Communications Theory Society. He received the Distinguished Alumnus Award from IIT Madras in 2008.


Friday, April 18, 2014

The Two-Residue ADC

Christopher W. Mangelsdorf

Host: Professor Ian Galton

Abstract
The two-residue architecture was conceived at a time when CMOS technology was just making its way into the commercial IC world. It was a time when analog design was a risky business: models were unreliable and component matching was largely unknown. The use of two-residues dodged these problems and enabled full converter performance in the face of a wide variety of block defects. But the idea never achieved widespread popularity because of the additional hardware penalty, and because CMOS design tools improved so rapidly, making design a predictable business again.
History repeats itself, and it is once again difficult to design blocks with high analog performance in the classic sense. Now it is the tiny modern transistors and claustrophobic low supplies that are the problem. But time has reshuffled the deck: the additional power and die cost of a little extra hardware are of no consequence now. We are in an environment that favors the two-residue architecture again. In fact, Broadcom [More...]

Bio
Christopher W. Mangelsdorf (S'77 - M'84) was born in Pennsylvania in 1955. He received a B.S. in physics, magna cum laude, from Davidson College, Davidson, NC in 1977. In 1980 and 1984, he received the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering at M.I.T. where he held the first Analog Devices Scholarship. He has been associated with Analog Devices since summer employment in 1980 and has been a Fellow of Analog Devices since 1998.
From 1996 to 2013, Dr. Mangelsdorf worked in Tokyo, running the Analog Devices Tokyo Design Center and then adding responsibility for the Shanghai and Beijing Design Centers with the title of Asia Technical Director. He recently moved to the Analog Devices San Diego office, where he is engaged in the development of high speed A/D converters.
Dr. Mangelsdorf is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Pi Sigma (physics), and has served on both the ISSCC Program Committee and the AdComm for the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society. He holds 16 patents and has [More...]


Friday, April 11, 2014

Time-to-Digital Converters for Digitizing Biology

Christopher Salthouse

Host: Professor Drew Hall

Abstract
In the fifty years since the invention of CMOS circuits, an army of scientists and engineers have worked to increase their complexity and speed while decreasing their size and power consumption to drive the computer revolution. In doing so, they developed a technology that is also well suited for a variety of other applications including the topic of this talk “Digitizing Biology.” This talk will present work from Prof. Salthouse’s lab on using the small size, high speed, and large complexity of integrated circuits to digitize the fluorescence from cells. The goal of this project is to replace a $30,000 flow cytometer that sits on a bench in a hospital lab with a $3 disposable flow cytometer that can be used wherever the patient is located. A central challenge in building this disposable flow cytometer is measuring the photon arrival time at each pixel. Single Photon Avalanche Diodes can detect the photon arrival, but the large area of time-to-digital converts has limited the num [More...]

Bio
Christopher Salthouse is the Dev and Linda Gupta Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He directs the Biomedical Electronics Laboratory and leads the engineering effort in the university’s new Center for Personalized Health Monitoring. Prior to joining the University of Massachusetts, Prof. Salthouse received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he used subthreshold analog circuit design to develop a micropower speech processor for cochlear implants that used less than 5% of the power of commercial alternatives. He then worked at Massachusetts General Hospital for three years developing biomedical imaging systems based on fluorescence lifetime imaging and up conversion imaging.


Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Using Posets into Coding Theory

Marcelo Firer

Host: Professor Massimo Franceschett

Abstract
Partial ordered on finite sets are used to define position-sensitive metrics over F_{q}ⁿ. We will make a very introductory presentation of those metrics and explain the apparent paradox that determining the packing radius may become absolutely intractable (even in 1 dimensional cases), while syndrome decoding may become a really affordable problem, becoming even a linear map.

Bio
Marcelo Firer made his doctorate in Mathematics at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, working on asymptotic geometry of symmetric spaces and relating some of those structures to (infinite) combinatorial structures. Out of those combinatorial structures I moved from the analytical world of Lie groups and symmetric spaces into discrete geometrical problems that arise in the context of Coding Theory. Working in the math department at State University of Campinas (Brazil), is spending a sabbatical semester at UCSD.


Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Using Posets into Coding Theory

Bobak Nazer

Host: Professor Massimo Franceschett

Abstract
Partial ordered on finite sets are used to define position-sensitive metrics over F_{q}ⁿ. We will make a very introductory presentation of those metrics and explain the apparent paradox that determining the packing radius may become absolutely intractable (even in 1 dimensional cases), while syndrome decoding may become a really affordable problem, becoming even a linear map.

Bio
Marcelo Firer made his doctorate in Mathematics at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, working on asymptotic geometry of symmetric spaces and relating some of those structures to (infinite) combinatorial structures. Out of those combinatorial structures I moved from the analytical world of Lie groups and symmetric spaces into discrete geometrical problems that arise in the context of Coding Theory. Working in the math department at State University of Campinas (Brazil), is spending a sabbatical semester at UCSD.


Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Modulation and Coding Techniques for Enhancing Flash Memory Endurance

Eyal En Gad

Host: Professor Massimo Franceschett

Abstract
Motivation: Current flash memory technology supports a relatively small number of write-erase cycles. This technology is effective for consumer devices (smartphones and cameras) where the number of write-erase cycles is small, however, it is not economical for enterprise storage systems that require a large number of lifetime writes. I will present two approaches for alleviating this problem.


ECC WOM codes: The first approach is to write a flash page multiple times before erasure, using an error-correcting code that takes into account the state of the page before writing. Such code is called an error correcting write-once memory code. I will show how to construct low complexity coding schemes that achieve the informational limits of the memory using polar coding techniques. Rank-modulation rewriting: The second approach is to improve reliability and endurance by representing the information using relative values via the rank modulation scheme. I will explain this modulation sche [More...]

Bio
Eyal En Gad is a PhD student of electrical engineering at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, working with Prof. Jehoshua Bruck. He received his Masters degree at the California Institute of Technology at 2012 and his Bachelors degree in electrical engineering at the Technion, Israel, at 2008. His research interests are in information theory, especially the design and analysis of coding techniques for data storage.


Friday, March 14, 2014

Design Considerations and Challenges for Handset Front End Modules

Dr. Nick Cheng

Host: Professor Peter Asbeck

Abstract
In 2013, the global smart phone shipment exceeded 1 billion units for the first time, covering about one-seventh of the world’s population. These smart phones show case a great evolution from the first voice-centric, analog cellular system AMPS that was commercially introduced in North America in 1978. With unprecedented multimedia services and enriched user experience, the complexity of handset designs have been escalating tremendously while the size and cost of cellular phones have continued to decline significantly. As a result, there is a clear motivation and path of evolution that highly integrated front end modules (FEM) are needed, as opposed to the discrete solutions, in particular for the 4G multi-band, multi-mode handset architectures.


Consequently, more challenges and higher expectations have been set to the development of front end modules (FEM) for handset and mobile applications. In addition to the standard requirements in performance, size, cost and quality at the m [More...]

Bio
Nick Cheng received the B.S. degree in nuclear engineering from National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, in 1989, the M.S.E.E. degree from Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY in 1994, and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of California, Santa Barbara, CA in 1999.


He is currently an engineering director and has been with Skyworks Solutions since 1999. He leads a design team with about 30 engineers and technician in developing next generation, highly integrated GSM/GPRS/EDGE/CDMA/WCDMA/HSPA/LTE and Multiband Multimode front end modules (FEM) for mobile and hand-set applications. More than 500 million units of his FEM products have been shipped to end customers. He was the recipient of Skyworks Innovation Award in 2008 and has been awarded with seven US patents since joining Skyworks in 1999. He has published more than 15 technical papers and has served on the RFIC Symposium Technical Program Committee since 2007. He also received Best Student Paper Aw [More...]


Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Cooperative Schemes for Real-Time Applications on Mobile Devices

Athina Markopoulou

Host: Professor Tara Javidi

Abstract
This talk gives an overview of our work on design and implementation of cooperative schemes, with network coding, for real-time applications on mobile devices. First, we consider video streaming: a group of mobile devices, within proximity of each other, are interested in watching the same video at the same time. The common practice today is that each device uses its own wireless connection to stream the video independently from the server, and typically the downlink bandwidth becomes the bottleneck. We propose a cooperative scheme, called MicroCast, which cooperatively uses all available network connections to boost video performance. Our design is rooted in a NUM formulation of the problem and includes the following key components: MicroDownload (a scheduling algorithm that decides which parts of the video to download from the server), MicroNC-P2P (a local all-to-all dissemination scheme), and MicroBroadcast (a local broadcast framework we designed specifically for Android devices). [More...]

Bio
Athina Markopoulou is an Associate Professor in EECS at the University of California, Irvine. She received the Diploma degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the National Technical University of Athens, Greece, in 1996, and the Master's and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University, in 1998 and 2003 respectively. She received the NSF CAREER award in 2008. She is a senior member of IEEE and an Associate Editor of IEEE/ACM Trans. on Networking.


Saturday, March 8, 2014

Microwave microsystems enabled by 3D silicon micromachining

Joachim Oberhammer

Host: Professor Gabriel Rebeiz

Abstract
This talk gives an overview of recent RF to millimeter-wave micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) developed at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden. The key enabling fabrication technology for the presented devices is 3-dimensional micromachining of silicon. Silicon is used both as a highly reliable mechanical material for integrated MEMS-reconfigurability, and as a low-loss dielectric material at microwave frequencies. Devices presented in this talk include: (1) W-band phase-shifters based on tuning a transmission line by moveable silicon-dielectric blocks; (2) MEMS-tuneable W-band high-impedance surfaces with applications for car radar, leaky-wave antennas, tuneable backshorts; (3) different devices realized in an SOI RF MEMS fabrication process, with the device reconfigurability implemented by moving the sidewalls of 3D-micromachined coplanar transmission lines: zero-power consumption interlocking switches, high-Q tuneable capacitors, and large bandwidth high-dire [More...]

Bio
Assoc. Prof. Joachim Oberhammer, born in Italy in 1976, received his M.Sc. degree in electrical engineering from Graz University of Technology, Austria, in 2000, and his Ph.D. degree from KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden, in 2004. After a pos-doctoral research fellowship at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, he returned to KTH for building up a research team in radio-frequency micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS). In 2008 he was a post-doctoral fellow at Kyoto University, Japan. In 2010, Dr. Oberhammer became an Associate Professor at KTH, continuing his work on microwave microsystems.


He is author and co-author of more than 100 reviewed research papers and holds 4 patents. In 2004, 2007, and 2008 he got an award by the Ericsson Research Foundation, a grant by the Swedish Innovation Bridge, and a scholarship by the Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science, respectively. The research work he is heading received six best paper awards (IEEE Europe [More...]


Thursday, March 6, 2014

Control over finite capacity channels: the role of data losses, delays and SNR limitations

Luca Schenato

Host: Professor Massimo Franceschett

Abstract
In this talk we will discuss the problem of feedback control design in the present of a finite capacity communication channel, which gives rise to tightly coupled limitations in terms of quantization errors, decoding/computational delays and erasure probability affecting the closed loop control performance. After providing an overview of the most notable results available in the literature, we will restrict the analysis in the context of LQG control subject to SNR limitations, packet loss, and delay and derive their impact on optimal design for the controller parameters. In particular, we will show that the stability of the closed loop system depends on a tradeoff among quantization, packet loss probability and delay. This analysis recaptures, as special cases, several results already available in the literature, both in the SRN-limited and rate-limited frameworks, that have treated packet loss, quantization error and delay separately. We will also reconsider the well studied problem p [More...]

Bio
Luca Schenato is currently Associate Professor at the Department of Information Engineering at the University of Padova. He received the Laurea Degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Padova in 1999, and the Ph.D. from the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department of UC Berkeley in 2003. From 2004 to 2007 he was the recipient of the Professorship ”Returning Brains” sponsored by the Italian Ministry of Education and he served as Adjunct Professor at the Department of Information Engineering at the University of Padova. He won the Eli Jury Award from the EECS Department of UC Berkeley in 2006 for his ”for outstanding achievement in the area of Systems, Communications, Control, or Signal Processing”. His expertise includes distributed control, estimation and optimization; networked control systems; wireless sensor networks; consensus algorithms; and biomimetic locomotion. He is also serving as Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions of Automatic Con [More...]


Wednesday, March 5, 2014

On Landau's Eigenvalue Theorem and Information Cut-Sets

Massimo Franceschetti

Host: Professor Tara Javidi

Abstract
In this talk, I am going to present a variation of a theorem of Landau concerning the phase transition of the eigenvalues of a time-frequency limiting, self-adjoint operator and describe its application to compute the number of degrees of freedom of square-integrable, multi-dimensional bandlimited functions in terms of Kolmogorov's n-width in some limiting regimes where the original theorem cannot be directly applied. This leads to determining up to order the total amount of information that can be transported in time and space by multiple-scattered electromagnetic waves, extending previous single-frequency treatments to signals of non-zero frequency bandwidth. In closing, I am going to sketch some relations to the holographic principle of quantum gravity and black hole thermodynamics.
Bio
Born in Naples, Italy, Professor Franceschetti graduated magna cum laude in computer engineering from the University of Naples in 1997. He received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology in 1999, and 2003 respectively. His doctoral thesis, entitled "Wireless Networks, from Collective Behavior to the Physics of Propagation" was awarded the Wilts Prize for best thesis in electrical engineering at Caltech in 2003. He also received the 2000 Walker von Brimer award for outstanding research at Caltech and the 2005 S.A. Schelkunoff Transactions prize paper award from the IEEE Antennas and Propagation society (jointly with profs. J. Bruck and L. J. Shulman) for his work on wave propagation and scattering based on random walk theory. Franceschetti has held visiting positions at at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam in the Netherlands, the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne in Switzerland, and the University of Trento in Italy. Before joi [More...]


Friday, February 7, 2014

Non-Asymptotic Analyses on Problems with Markovian Memory

Shun Watanabe

Host: Professor Tara Javidi

Abstract
Non-asymptotic (or finite blocklength) analysis is becoming an important topic in information theory recently, and many non-asymptotic bounds have been obtained so far for the memoryless case. For problems with Markovian memory, the existing bounds are not useful in the sense that they are not efficiently computable. In this talk, we consider the source coding problem with side-information and the random number generation problem with side-information. We will introduce two kinds of conditional Renyi entropies for transition matrices, and derive non-asymptotic bounds for the problems by using them. The derived bounds are efficiently computable in the sense that the computational complexity does not depend on the blocklength, and they are asymptotically tight in the large deviation regime and the moderate deviation regime.
This is a joint work with Masahito Hayashi.
Bio
Shun Watanabe received B.E., M.E., and Ph.D. degree from Tokyo Institute of Technology in 2005, 2007, and 2009, respectively. Since April 2009, he has been an assistant professor of the Department of Information Science and Intelligence Systems at the University of Tokushima. Since April 2013, he also has been a visiting assistant professor of the Institute for Systems Research at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is a member of IEEE and IEICE.


Wednesday, February 5, 2014

Distributed Game Theoretic Optimization and Management of Multi-Channel ALOHA Networks

Kobi Cohen

Host: Professor Tara Javidi

Abstract
We consider the problem of distributed rate maximization in multi-channel ALOHA networks. We mainly focus on networks containing a large number of users that transmit typically over a low number of channels.


First, we consider the problem of constrained distributed rate maximization, where user rates are subject to total transmission probability constraints. Users exploit the channel state information and the channel utilization to learn the current utility on the channels. We propose a best-response algorithm for the distributed rate maximization, where each user updates its strategy according to the network state. We prove the convergence of the algorithm to a Nash equilibrium in both homogeneous and heterogeneous networks using the theory of potential games. Next, we consider the case where users are not restricted by transmission probability constraints. Distributed rate maximization under uncertainty is considered to achieve both efficiency and fairness among users. We propose [More...]

Bio
Kobi Cohen received the B.Sc. and Ph.D degrees in electrical engineering from Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel, in 2007, 2012, respectively. He is currently a postdoc researcher with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Davis, CA. His research interests include signal processing techniques and communication protocols for resource-constrained systems, dynamic spectrum management for wireless and wireline networks and applications of game theory for networks.


Friday, January 31, 2014

Power Conversion for Next Generation Shipboard Applications

Daniel Seltzer

Host: Professor Gabriel Rebeiz

Abstract
The average age of US Naval vessels is currently 18 years, and is only expected to increase over the next five years. At the same time as these ships age, new technologies such as electrical take off assistance for aircraft, advanced radar systems, and laser and rail gun defensive technologies are becoming mature enough for field use. Due to the large cost in terms of money, man power, and materials, it is highly desirable to retrofit the aging fleet with new technologies. It is generally not possible to simply build a new aircraft carrier; old systems must be adapted instead of replaced.


Many of these new technologies are extremely power hungry, placing demands on energy distribution systems built ten to twenty years ago which are simply unrealistic. Neither the generation nor the distribution and storage networks exist to handle the increased load. As there is simply no way to increase the volume of an old ship to accommodate more fuel and more generation capabilities in order to [More...]

Bio
Daniel Seltzer received the Masters degree in electrical engineering at the University of Colorado Boulder in 2010. He is currently continuing his work with the University of Colorado while pursuing his Ph.D. in power electronics. A visiting scholar at Utah State University, Daniel is also involved with developing courses in power electronics for a multi-university course share program. His research focuses on modeling techniques and their application in the control of power electronic systems.


Wednesday, January 29, 2014

ITLinQ: A New Approach for Spectrum Sharing in Device-to Device Communication Systems

Salman Avestimehr

Host: Professor Tara Javidi

Abstract
We consider the problem of spectrum sharing in device-to-device communication systems. We define a new concept of information-theoretic independent sets (ITIS), which indicates the sets of users for which simultaneous communication and treating the interference from each other as noise is information-theoretically optimal (to within a constant gap). Based on this concept, we develop a new spectrum sharing mechanism, called information-theoretic link scheduling (ITLinQ), which at each time schedules those users that form an ITIS. We demonstrate that ITLinQ can outperform similar state-of-the-art spectrum sharing mechanisms, such as FlashLinQ, by more than a 100% of sum-rate gain, while keeping the complexity at the same level.
Bio
Salman Avestimehr is an Associate Professor at the EE department of University of Southern California. He was also a postdoctoral scholar at the Center for the Mathematics of Information (CMI) at Caltech in 2008. Salman is a recipient of numerous awards and recognitions including the Communications Society and Information Theory Society Joint Paper Award in 2013 and the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) in 2011, the Michael Tien ’72 Excellence in Teaching Award in 2012, the Young Investigator Program (YIP) award from the U. S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research in 2011, the National Science Foundation CAREER award in 2010, and the David J. Sakrison Memorial Prize in 2008.


Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Designing Optimal Resource Sharing in the Long Run

Mihaela van der Schaar

Host: Professor Tara Javidi

Abstract
The problem of resource sharing is ubiquitous: transceivers need to share the scarce wireless spectrum; traffic flows need to share routers’ available bandwidth; applications and tasks need to share the central processing units (CPUs) and memory of computer systems; consumer appliances need to share the available energy supply etc. A key feature of all such resource sharing problems is that the use of the resource by a single agent (e.g. a user, a transceiver, an application) has a negative effect on the usage of other agents sharing the same resource. Existing state-of-the-art solutions to this problem are generally inefficient, require extensive and perfect feedback and monitoring, and most of the time cannot cope with dynamic entry and exit or self-interested users.
In this talk, I will propose a novel, systematic and practical design framework for distributed resource sharing that is optimal (efficient), decentralized, requires minimal and imperfect feedback and monitoring, all [More...]

Bio
Mihaela van der Schaar is Chancellor's Professor of Electrical Engineering at University of California, Los Angeles. She is an IEEE Fellow, a Distinguished Lecturer of the Communications Society, and a recipient of numerous awards and recognitions. She is also the founding director of the UCLA Center for Engineering Economics, Learning, and Networks.


Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Catching Up Faster by Switching Sooner: Improved Data Compression and Statistical Inference with Nested Models

Peter Grünwald

Host: Professor Tara Javidi

Abstract
We partially resolve a long-standing debate in statistics, known as the AIC-BIC dilemma: model selection/averaging methods like BIC, Bayes factor model selection, and MDL (minimum description length) are consistent (they eventually infer the correct model) but, when used for prediction, the rate at which predictions improve can be suboptimal. Methods like AIC and leave-one-out cross-validation are inconsistent but typically converge at the optimal rate. We give a novel analysis of the slow convergence of the Bayesian-type methods in terms of data compression. Based on this analysis, we propose the switching method, a modification of Bayesian model averaging/MDL universal codes that achieves both consistency and optimal convergence rates. Experiments with regression confirm that our large-sample theoretical results also hold in practice in small samples. We also discuss how our results can coexist with those of Yang (2005), who proved that the strengths of AIC and BIC cannot always be s [More...]

Bio
Peter Grünwald heads the information-theoretic learning group at the Centrum voor Wiskunde en Informatica (CWI), the Dutch national research institute for mathematics and computer science, located in Amsterdam. He is also part-time full professor (a very Dutch construction) at Leiden University. His research interests lie where statistics, computer science and information theory meet: theories of learning from data. He is author of the book The Minimum Description Length Principle, MIT Press, June 2007. April 2010 he was co-awarded the Van Dantzig prize. Until July 2010 he headed the NWO VIDI research project Learning when All Models are Wrong. As of July 2010, he heads the NWO VICI project Safe Statistics. He is a steering committee member of the EU PASCAL Network of Excellence.


Wednesday, December 11, 2013

On Cooperative Radio Resource Allocation techniques based on Game Theory

Ephi Zehavi

Host: Prof. Larry Milstein

Abstract
Modern wireless communication systems are operating over multiple frequency selective channels, in which users can change their transmission or reception parameters to communicate efficiently by avoiding interference from other users. In the last several years major research efforts were concentrated on finding cooperative strategies for allocating radio resources efficiently under system constraints.
While the single-carrier problems are commonly easily to address, the multi-carrier problems are more complex and have major role in the evolution of future wireless systems based on Orthogonal Frequency Division Multi Access (OFDMA).
In the talk we address the multi-carrier allocation problem. We will outline several cooperative approaches (solutions) for sharing K frequency bins between N users. The following solutions will be introduced: Stable Matching solution, Nash Bargaining Solution (NBS), and Raiffa's Discrete Bargaining Solution. We will show that all these solutions can be wr [More...]

Bio
Ephi Zehavi received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in electrical engineering from the Technion Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa, in 1977 and 1981, respectively, and his Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, in 1986. In 1985, he joined Qualcomm Inc., in San Diego, California. From 1988 to 1992, he was a faculty member at the Department of Electrical Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology. In 1992, he rejoined Qualcomm Inc. as a principal engineer. Upon his return to Israel in 1994, he became an assistant general manager of Engineering in Qualcomm Israel, Ltd., and later became the general manager. In 1999 he co-founded Mobilian Inc. and served as CTO until 2002. In 2003, he joined the University of Bar Ilan faculty, where he is now Vice Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and the head of the communication track. He is the co-recipient of the 1994 IEEE Stephen O. Rice Award and he is named as an IEEE fellow for his contri [More...]


Friday, November 22, 2013

Cognitive Access Policies under a Primary ARQ process via Forward-Backward Interference Cancellation

Michele Zorzi

Host: Professor Young Han Kim

Abstract
This paper introduces a novel technique for access by a cognitive Secondary User (SU) using best-effort transmission to a spectrum with an incumbent Primary User (PU), which uses Type-I Hybrid ARQ. The technique leverages the primary ARQ protocol to perform Interference Cancellation (IC) at the SU receiver (SUrx). Two IC mechanisms that work in concert are introduced: Forward IC, where SUrx, after decoding the PU message, cancels its interference in the (possible) following PU retransmissions of the same message, to improve the SU throughput; Backward IC, where SUrx performs IC on previous SU transmissions, whose decoding failed due to severe PU interference. Secondary access policies are designed that determine the secondary access probability in each state of the network so as to maximize the average long-term SU throughput by opportunistically leveraging IC, while causing bounded average long-term PU throughput degradation and SU power expenditure. It is proved that the optimal poli [More...]

Bio
Michele Zorzi is a Professor at the Department of Information Engineering of the University of Padova. Prior to his current appointment, he was employed at the Politecnico di Milano, the University of Ferrara and the University of California at San Diego, with which he still has an active collaboration. He received a PhD in Electrical Engineering from the University of Padova in 1994. Michele was the EiC of the IEEE Wireless Communications magazine in 2003-2005, and the EiC of the IEEE Transactions on Communications in 2008-2011, and has served on the Editorial Boards of the top journals in his area of research and on the Organizing and Technical Program Committee for many international conferenced. He is an IEEE Fellow. His main research interests are in the area of wireless communications and networking, sensor networks and IoT, underwater communications and networks, cognitive networking, and energy-efficient protocol design. His work is widely cited, with a total of more than 11000 [More...]


Friday, November 22, 2013

Non-Foster Circuits and Applications

Carson White, Ph.D.

Host: Professor Gabriel Rebeiz

Abstract
Non-Foster circuits have attracted significant attention in the past decade because they promise to break the fundamental bandwidth limitations of electrically-small antennas and metamaterials. The fundamental limitations of passive networks and media have been known for nearly a century: Foster’s reactance theorem (1924), the Chu limit for electrically-small antennas (1948), Fano’s impedance matching limit (1948) and Sommerfeld’s characterization of wave propagation in dispersive media (1914). Active circuits that break some of these fundamental limitations have been known for just as long, in addition to knowledge of what types of immittances are realizable (Bode, 1945; Linvill, 1954). However, reports of successful demonstrations were limited to HF frequencies and below and discussion of the topic waned.

Active impedance-matching networks—now called “non-Foster circuits” because they break Foster’s reactance theorem in the ideal case—have been given renewed at [More...]

Bio
Dr. White received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Washington, Seattle, in 2002, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 2004 and 2008, respectively, where he developed dual-polarized antennas whose polarizations could be tuned independently over nearly one octave, in addition to millimeter-wave planar constrained lenses. Dr. White joined HRL Laboratories, LLC in 2008 where he is currently a member of the technical staff researching non-Foster networks for antennas and metamaterials, among other topics in antennas and RF circuits. He has authored and coauthored seven IEEE publications regarding non-Foster circuits and applications


Friday, November 15, 2013

VIP: A Framework for Joint Dynamic Forwarding and Caching in Named Data Networks

Edmund Yeh

Host: Professor Young Han Kim

Abstract
Emerging information-centricnetworking architectures, suchas Named Data Networking (NDN), are currently transforming the landscape of networking research. Information-centric networking replaces the traditional client server model of communications with one based on the identity of data or content. This abstraction more accurately reflects how the Internet is primarily used today: instead of being concerned about communicating with specific nodes, end users are mainly interested in obtaining the data they want.


A primary goal of information-centric networking is the optimal utilization of both bandwidth and storage for efficient content distribution. This highlights the need for joint design of traffic engineering and caching strategies, in order to optimize network performance in view of both current traffic loads and future traffic demands. We present the VIP (Virtual Interest Packet) framework for joint dynamic interest request forwarding and dynamic cache placement and evicti [More...]

Bio
Edmund Yeh received his B.S. in Electrical Engineering with Distinction from Stanford University in 1994, his M.Phil in Engineering from the University of Cambridge in 1995, and his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT under Professor Robert Gallager in 2001. Since July 2011, he has been Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Northeastern University. Previously, he was Assistant and Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, Computer Science, and Statistics at Yale University. He has held visiting positions at MIT, Princeton, University of California at Berkeley, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), and Technical University of Munich. Professor Yeh is the recipient of the Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellowship, the Army Research Office Young Investigator Award, the Winston Churchill Scholarship, the National Science Foundation and Office of Naval Research Graduate Fellowships, the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship [More...]


Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Resource Sharing in Stochastic Networks

Ruth Williams

Host: Professor Young Han Kim

Abstract
Stochastic models of processing networks arise in a wide variety of applications in science and engineering, e.g., in high-tech manufacturing, transportation, telecommunications, computer systems, customer service systems, and biochemical reaction networks. These "stochastic processing networks" typically have entities, such as jobs, vehicles, packets, customers or molecules, that move along paths or routes, receive processing from various resources, and that are subject to the effects of stochastic variability through such variables as arrival times, processing times and routing protocols. Networks arising in modern applications are often heterogeneous in that different entities share (i.e., compete for) common network resources. Frequently the processing capacity of resources is limited and there are bottlenecks, resulting in congestion and delay due to entities waiting for processing. The control and analysis of such networks present challenging mathematical problems.


This talk [More...]

Bio
Ruth Williams, a professor of mathematics, joined the UC San Diego faculty in 1983 and currently holds the Charles Lee Powell Chair in Mathematics I. Her research is focused on probability, stochastic processes and their applications. She is especially well known for her work on theory and applications associated with stochastic networks, which arise in semiconductor manufacturing, telecommunications, computer systems, Internet congestion control and genetic circuits.


Ruth Williams is a member of the US National Academy of Sciences, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics and has been a U.S. National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator, an Alfred P. Sloan Fellow, and a Guggenheim Fellow. She is a past President of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, a major professional society for those doing research in probability and statistics. Ruth William [More...]


Wednesday, October 30, 2013

Frames and Spherical Codes: where Slepian meets Fourier and Galois

Babak Hassibi

Host: Professor Young Han Kim

Abstract
Frames and spherical codes are objects with a rich history and arise in numerous applications: CDMA, SDMA, compressive sensing, quantum measurements, MIMO communications, etc., where one seeks a set of vectors with pairwise correlation as low as possible. Geometrically, frames and spherical codes attempt to quantize the unit sphere (in some arbitrary dimension) as uniformly as possible. In 1968, David Slepian proposed a framework for constructing frames: start with a unit vector and some group of unitary matrices and construct the frame vectors by applying the unitary matrices, one at a time, to the first unit vector. Slepian showed that, due to the symmetries induced by the group, such frames have many desirable properties. However, he never gave explicit constructions nor any recipes for how to choose the underlying group.


We will revisit the classical problem of designing low coherence frames using Slepians' approach and study the consequences for several families of finite group [More...]

Bio
Babak Hassibi is the Gordon M Binder/Amgen Professor and Executive Officer of Electrical Engineering at Caltech. He obtained his PhD from Stanford University and prior to Caltech was with the Mathematical Sciences Research Center at Bell Laboratories. His research interests span communications, control and signal processing. Among other awards, he is the recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers and the David and Lucille Packard Fellowship in Science and Engineering.


Friday, October 25, 2013

Oct. 25, 2013 Review


Abstract

Morning Presentations
8:30 Continental breakfast
9:00 Welcome – Paul Yu
9:05 A mostly-digitial TDC-free 2.8-3.5 GHz frequency synthesizer – Ian Galton
9:30 Experiments with apps for societal impact – Ramesh Rao
9:55 Caching at the Wireless Edge: New Architectures for Wireless Video Delivery – Giuseppe Caire, USC
10:45 Point-of-care medical diagnostics – Drew Hall
11:10 Designing modems for an imperfect world – Steve Gardner, ViaSat
11:40 Device-to-device and relay-enhanced cellular architecture – Larry Milstein
12:00 Lunch


Afternoon Project Reviews, Chair Patrick Mercier
1:00 Switching-mode power amplifiers for multiband applications – Peter Asbeck
1:20 Enabling circuits for wideband wireless communications – Ian Galton
1:40 Next generation cognitive networks – Tara Javidi
2:00 Towards enabling personalized and interactive video services – Sujit Dey
2:30 1-minute poster overviews – CWC students and post-docs
3:00 Poster presenta [More...]



Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Compression for Similarity Queries

Tsachy Weissman

Host: Professor Young Han Kim

Abstract
I will talk about compression when the goal is to concisely represent sequences in a way that allows to determine whether they are similar to a given query sequence. The problem arises in an increasing variety of contexts from genomics to forensics to internet search. We characterize achievable tradeoffs between conciseness of the representation, similarity level, and reliability of the answers to the queries, with particular focus on the practically motivated case where false negatives (misdetections) are not allowed. Guided by the theoretical findings, we construct and experiment with practical compressors for queries. The performance of these schemes is seen to approach the theoretical limits on simulated and real data. Connections to existing literature and future directions will be discussed.


Based on collaborations with Thomas Courtade, Amir Ingber, Idoia Ochoa and Golan Yona.
Bio
Tsachy Weissman graduated summa cum laude with a B.Sc. in Electrical Engineering from the Technion in 1997, and earned his Ph.D. at the same institution in 2001. He then worked at Hewlett Packard Laboratories with the information theory group until 2003, when he joined Stanford University, where he is Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and incumbent of the STMicroelectronics chair in the School of Engineering. He has spent the academic years 2007-09 on leave with the Department of Electrical Engineering at the Technion.


Professor Weissman’s research is focused on information theory, statistical signal processing, the interplay between them, and their applications. He is the inventor of several patents and has been involved in a number of companies as researcher or member of the technical board. His honors include an NSF CAREER award, several best paper awards, Horev fellowship for Leaders in Science and Technology, Henry Taub prize for excellence in research, and IEEE [More...]


Monday, October 21, 2013

Kandou Codes for Chip-to-Chip Communication

Amin Shokrollahi

Host: Professor Young Han Kim

Abstract
Modern electronic devices consist of a multitude of IC components: the processor, the memory, the RF modem and the baseband chip (in wireless devices), and the graphics processor, are only some examples of components scattered throughout a device. The increase of the volume of digital data that needs to be accessed and processed by such devices calls for ever faster communication between these IC's. Faster communication, however, often translates to higher susceptibility to various types of noise, and inevitably to a higher power consumption in order to combat the noise. This increase in power consumption is, for the most part, far from linear, and cannot be easily compensated for by Moore's Law. In this talk I will give a short overview of problems encountered in chip-to-chip communication, and will advocate the use of novel coding techniques to solve those problems. I will also briefly talk about Kandou Bus, and some of the approaches the company is taking to design, implement, and m [More...]

Bio
Amin Shokrollahi finished his PhD at the University of Bonn in 1991. From 1991 to 1995 he was an assistant at the same university, before moving to the International Computer Science Institute in Berkeley in 1995. In 1998 he joined the Bell Laboratories as a Member of the Technical Staff. In 2000 he joined the startup company Digital Fountain as their Chief Scientist, a position he had until Digital Fountain�s acquisition by Qualcomm in 2009. In 2003 he joined EPFL where he has the chairs of Algorithmic Mathematics in the Math department, and algorithmics in the Computer Science department. In 2011 he founded the company Kandou Bus (http://www.kandou.com) which uses novel approaches from discrete mathematics, algorithm design, and electronics to design fast and energy efficient chip-to-chip communication links.

Amin�s research interests are varied and cover coding theory, discrete mathematics, algorithm design, theoretical computer science, signal processing, networking [More...]


Wednesday, October 16, 2013

From Stochastic Control to Feedback Codes

Tara Javidi

Host: Professor Young Han Kim

Abstract
This talk considers the problem of variable-length coding over a discrete memoryless channel (DMC) with noiseless feedback. After briefly reviewing known results regarding reliable variable-length codes, we show that the design of variable-length coding with feedback is a special case of a well known problem in stochastic control theory, namely that of sequential design of experiments (SDE). The problem of sequential design of experiments, introduced and studied by statisticians such as Blackwell, DeGroot, and Chernoff in the 50s and 60s, considers a decision maker who is responsible to dynamically collect observations so as to enhance his information in a speedy manner about an underlying phenomenon of interest while accounting for the penalty of wrong declarations.


The main focus of the talk is to reexamine the problem of variable-length coding in light of this connection between channel coding and SDE. In particular, motivated by DeGroot's interpretation of information utility as [More...]

Bio
Tara Javidi studied electrical engineering at Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran from 1992 to 1996. She received the MS and PhD degrees in electrical engineering (systems), and the MS in applied mathematics (stochastics) from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. From 2002 to 2004, she was an assistant professor at the Electrical Engineering Department, University of Washington, Seattle. She joined University of California, San Diego, in 2005.


Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Selfish routing: networks, games, and individual choice

Ilze Ziedins

Host: Professor Young Han Kim

Abstract
It is well-known that adding extra capacity to queues in networks where individuals choose their own route can sometimes severely degrade performance, rather than improving it. We will discuss some simple examples of queueing networks where this is the case under probabilistic routing, but where under state-dependent routing the worst case performance is no longer seen. This raises the question of whether giving arrivals more information about the state of the network leads to better performance more generally.
Bio
Ilze Ziedins' research is in stochastic networks and queueing theory. She works on the modelling, analysis and optimisation of stochastic networks, with particular application to communications networks, transportation networks and, latterly, healthcare systems. Current themes include modelling and optimisation of patient flow in hospital systems; system optimal and user optimal admission and routing controls in queueing networks; and phase transitions and controls in loss networks.


Ilze has a BA from Waikato University and a PhD from Cambridge University. She has been at Auckland University since 1993, and prior to that held a Research Fellowship at Girton College, Cambridge, and then a lecturing position at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh.


Friday, September 20, 2013

Integer-forcing for channels, sources and ADCs

Or Ordentlich

Host: Professor Alon Orlitsky

Abstract
Integer-Forcing (IF) is a new framework, based on compute-and-forward, for decoding multiple integer linear combinations from the output of a Gaussian multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) or multiple-access (MAC) channel. Integer-forcing is applicable when all transmitters use nested linear/lattice codes.
 
Building on the IF framework, we derive new theoretical results and develop new low-complexity coding schemes for several problems.
 
We begin by studying the capacity region of the Gaussian MAC under the constraint that all users transmit from a chain of nested lattice codes. Interestingly, the obtained rate-region depends on number-theoretic properties of the channel gains. Then, we apply these results in conjunction with lattice interference alignment to approximate the sum capacity of the symmetric K-user Gaussian interference channel.
 
We next apply the IF approach to arrive at a new low-complexity scheme, IF source coding, for distributed lossy compression of corre [More...]

Bio
Or Ordentlich received the B.Sc. degree (cum laude) and the M.Sc. degree (summa cum laude) in 2010 and 2011, respectively, in electrical engineering from Tel Aviv University, Israel. He is currently working toward the Ph.D. degree at Tel Aviv University.


Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Asymptotics of the invariant measure in mean-field model with jumps

Rajesh Sundaresan

Host: Professor Tara Javidi

Abstract
I will discuss the asymptotics of the invariant measure for the process of the empirical spatial distribution of N coupled Markov chains in the limit of a large number of chains. Each chain reflects the stochastic evolution of one particle. The chains are coupled through the dependence of the transition rates on this spatial distribution of particles in the various states. The model is a caricature for medium access interactions in wireless local area networks. It is also applicable to the study of spread of epidemics in a network. The limiting process satisfies a deterministic ordinary differential equation called the McKean-Vlasov equation. When this differential equation has a unique globally asymptotically stable equilibrium, the spatial distribution asymptotically concentrates on this equilibrium. More generally, its limit points are supported on a subset of the omega-limit sets of the McKean-Vlasov equation. I will provide a very brief summary on large deviations of the invariant [More...]

Bio
Rajesh Sundaresan is a visiting scholar at the Coordinated Science Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is an associate professor at the ECE department of the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. He is visiting the Coordinated Science Laboratory on an Indo-US Science and Technology Forum Fellowship. He received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Princeton University in 1999, designed wireless modems at Qualcomm Incorporated from 1999 to 2005, and joined the faculty of the Indian Institute of Science in 2005. His research interests are in the areas of information theory and networks.


Thursday, June 6, 2013

Efficient Two-Way Relaying Schemes for Amplify and Forward Relays with Multiple Antennas

Martin Haardt

Host: Professor Alon Orlitsky

Abstract
Relaying will be an important component of future mobile communication systems. In particular, two-way relaying is known to exploit the radio resources in a very efficient manner as it allows for the bidirectional exchange of information in only two time slots while all nodes operate in half-duplex mode. In this talk, we focus on two-way relaying with amplify- and-forward (AF) relays that have multiple antennas. Compared to Decode-and-Forward (DF) relays, AF relays incur less transmission delay, are transparent to the underlying modulation and coding schemes, and require less hardware complexity.


In the talk, we present various approaches for designing the relay amplification matrix in such a setting. We discuss simple algebraic designs that are in general sub-optimal. Yet, they demonstrate a very good performance in numerical simulations. Such algebraic designs are quite relevant in practice, where tedious computations need to be avoided due to hardware constraints in terms of proc [More...]

Bio
Martin Haardt has been a Full Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology and Head of the Communications Research Laboratory at Ilmenau University of Technology, Germany, since 2001. He has also served as an Honorary Visiting Professor in the Department of Electronics at the University of York, United Kingdom, since 2012.


After studying electrical engineering at the Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany, and at Purdue University, USA, he received his Diplom-Ingenieur (M.S.) degree from the Ruhr-University Bochum in 1991 and his Doktor-Ingenieur (Ph.D.) degree from Munich University of Technology in 1996.


In 1997 he joint Siemens Mobile Networks in Munich, Germany, where he was responsible for strategic research for third generation mobile radio systems. From 1998 to 2001 he was the Director for International Projects and University Cooperations in the mobile infrastructure business of Siemens in Munich, where his work focused on mobile communication [More...]


Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Topological Interference Management

Syed Ali Jafar

Host: Professor Alon Orlitsky

Abstract
We will revisit the robust principles of ignoring interference when it is weak and avoiding it when it is strong, in both cases exploring information theoretic optimality with very limited channel knowledge at the transmitters. In particular, this will involve understanding the index coding problem from an interference alignment perspective.
Bio
Syed Ali Jafar received his B. Tech. from IIT Delhi, India, in 1997, M.S. from Caltech, USA, in 1999, and Ph.D. from Stanford, USA, in 2003, all in Electrical Engineering. His industry experience includes positions at Lucent Bell Labs , Qualcomm Inc. and Hughes Software Systems. He is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA USA. His research interests include multiuser information theory and wireless communications.


Dr. Jafar received the NSF CAREER award in 2006, the ONR Young Investigator Award in 2008, the Information Theory Society paper award in 2009, the Maseeh Outstanding Research Award in 2010, and an IEEE GLOBECOM Best Paper Award in 2012. Dr. Jafar received the UC Irvine EECS Professor of the Year award four times, in 2006, 2009, 2011 and 2012, from the Engineering Students Council and the Teaching Excellence Award in 2012 from the School of Engineering. He was a Un [More...]


Monday, May 13, 2013

Networked Information Processing: New Compression, Processing and Control Paradigms for Networks

Emrah Akyol

Host: Professor Alon Orlitsky

Abstract
Resource (energy, bandwidth, delay, storage) constraints are the key factors in designing the current and emerging communications, networking and signal processing applications. Such applications strongly motivate foregoing the convenience of digital communication and revisiting the potential benefits, and even necessity of analog communication, albeit in the modern context of source-channel coding. In the first part of the talk, I will present the major challenges and my research efforts in analog networking, including the derivation of a theoretical foundation from estimation and information theoretic principles, optimal algorithm design based on principles derived from statistical physics, i.e., deterministic annealing. Analog networking problem is intrinsically connected to the interplay between communications and control, namely stochastic networked control. The theoretical results obtained from analog networking shed light on the open stochastic control problems, such as the jam [More...]

Bio
Emrah Akyol received the B.Sc. degree in 2003 from Bilkent University, the M.Sc. degree in 2005 from Koc University (both in Turkey), and the Ph.D. degree in 2011 in electrical and computer engineering from UC Santa Barbara. From 2005 to 2007, he held positions at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories and NTT Docomo Laboratories (both in Palo Alto, CA) and UCLA, where he worked on several topics in multimedia compression and networking.


Tuesday, April 9, 2013

Variable-Length Coding with Feedback: Finite-Length Analysis and Optimization

Tsung-Yi Chen

Host: Professor Alon Orlitsky

Abstract
Increasing demand for high-quality, high-data-rate connections presents a significant challenge to system designers. Feedback helps to meet this challenge by allowing adaptation through communication from the receiver back to the transmitter. Commonly deployed feedback systems include automatic repeat request (ARQ) systems that ask for missed data packets to be retransmitted and hybrid ARQ systems that augment unsuccessful packet transmissions with additional error protection. This talk will show that the performance gap between these methods and the optimized variable-length coding scheme can be significant without a careful treatment in system design. To demonstrate a system that operates with low latency and near-capacity throughput through an efficient use of feedback, this talk addresses the following: (1) analysis of feedback systems with various practical constraints, (2) optimization of the parameters related to an efficient feedback system, and (3) design of rate-compatible ch [More...]

Bio
Tsung-Yi Chen is currently a Ph.D. candidate at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Department of Electrical Engineering. He is a recipient of the 2012-2013 UCLA Dissertation Year Fellowship. He received his M.S. degree from UCLA in 2009, and his B.S. degree from National Tsing Hua University in 2007, both in Electrical Engineering. His research is mainly focused on low-latency communication with feedback, which includes the analysis of variable-length feedback codes and the design of practical variable-length feedback codes.


Tuesday, March 12, 2013

From Likelihood Filtering to Quantum Probabilities

Hans-Andrea Loeliger

Host: Professor Alon Orlitsky

Abstract
The talk is about some recent ideas in statistical modeling and signal processing using state space models. After a brief introduction to factor graphs (which are used throughout), the talk addresses detection of pulse-like signals, glue factors and likelihood filtering, the unexpected capabilities of forward-only filtering, input signal estimation in continuous-time linear Gaussian models, and the factor graph representation of probabilities in quantum mechanics.
Bio
Hans-Andrea Loeliger is a professor at the Department of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering of ETH Zurich. From this same institution, he received a diploma in electrical engineering and a PhD degree (in 1992). From 1992 to 1995, he was with Linköping University, Sweden. From 1995 to 2000, he was a full-time technical consultant and co-owner of a consulting company, from where he returned to ETH in 2000. His research interests lie in the broad areas of signal processing, statistical models, information theory, error correcting codes, communications, system theory, and electronics. He is a Fellow of the IEEE.


Friday, February 1, 2013

Integration of Sensing, Communication, and Navigation in Mobile Networks

Yasamin Mostofi

Host: Professor Alon Orlitsky

Abstract
The unprecedented growth of sensing, communications, and computation in the past few years has fundamentally changed the way we understand and process information. The vision of a multi-agent robotic network cooperatively learning and adapting in harsh unknown environments to achieve a common goal is closer than ever. In order to realize this vision, however, we need a foundational understanding of the interplay between sensing, communications and control in these systems. On the sensing side, a mobile network tasked with a certain exploratory mission faces an abundance of information. In such an information-rich world, there is simply not enough time to sample the whole environment. On the communication side, the communication between mobile agents can be severely degraded due to several propagation phenomena, making connectivity maintenance challenging. We then have the following important open question: what are the fundamentals of group decision making in these systems, so that th [More...]

Bio
Yasamin Mostofi received the BS degree in electrical engineering from Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran, in 1997, and the MS and PhD degrees in the area of wireless communication systems from Stanford University, California, in 1999 and 2004, respectively. She is currently an associate professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of California Santa Barbara. Prior to that, she was a faculty in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of New Mexico from 2006 to 2012. She was a postdoctoral scholar in control and dynamical systems at the California Institute of Technology from 2004 to 2006.


Dr. Mostofi is the recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER award, and IEEE 2012 Outstanding Engineer Award of Region 6. She also received the Bellcore fellow-advisor award from Stanford Center for Telecommunications in 1999 [More...]


Thursday, January 10, 2013

Near-Optimal Quantization and Encoding for Oversampled Signals

Rayan Saab

Host: Professor Alon Orlitsky

Abstract
Analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion is the process by which signals (e.g., bandlimited functions or finite dimensional vectors) are replaced by bit streams to allow digital storage, transmission, and processing. Typically, A/D conversion is thought of as being composed of sampling and quantization. Sampling consists of collecting inner products of the signal with appropriate (deterministic or random) vectors. Quantization consists of replacing these inner products with elements from a finite set. A good A/D scheme allows for accurate reconstruction of the original object from its quantized samples. In this talk we investigate the reconstruction error as a function of the bit-rate, of Sigma-Delta quantization, a class of quantization algorithms used in the oversampled regime. We propose an encoding of the Sigma-Delta bit-stream and prove that it yields near-optimal error rates when coupled with a suitable reconstruction algorithm. This is true both in the finite dimensional setting and f [More...]



Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Two Network Problems and Their Application to Streaming Codes

Tracey Ho

Host: Professor Alon Orlitsky

Abstract
e consider two established network-related problems, whose complete solutions are open. The first is a resource allocation problem that can be posed in a distributed storage context as follows. The problem is to store a unit size data object on a set of storage nodes such that the total amount of storage used does not exceed a given budget, and the probability of successful recovery is maximized under a given probabilistic model for node failure/accessibility. The second is network error correction coding for reliable communication over networks where arbitrary errors can occur on an unknown subset of links. We describe how some of our recent results on these two problems can be combined to design and analyze erasure correction coding for online streaming under probabilistic packet erasures.
Bio
Tracey Ho is an Assistant Professor in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the California Institute of Technology. She received a Ph.D. (2004) and B.S. and M.Eng degrees (1999) in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). She was a co-recipient of the 2009 Communications & Information Theory Society Joint Paper Award. Her primary research interests are in information theory, network coding and communication networks.


Monday, November 19, 2012

The Art of Gambling in a Team: Multi-player multi-armed bandits

Rahul Jain

Host: Professor Alon Orlitsky

Abstract
Multi-Armed bandits are an elegant model of learning in an unknown and uncertain environment. Such models are relevant in many scenarios, and of late have received increased attention recently due to various problems of distributed control that have arisen in wireless networks, pricing models on the internet, etc. We consider a non-Bayesian multi-armed bandit setting proposed by Lai & Robbins in mid-80s. There are multiple arms each of which generates an i.i.d. reward from an unknown distribution. There are multiple players, each of whom is choosing which arm to play. If two or more players choose the same arm, they all get zero rewards. The problem is to design a learning algorithm to be used by the players that results in an orthogonal matching of players to arms (e.g., users to channels in wireless networks), and moreover minimizes the expected regret.


We first consider this as an online bipartite matching problem. We model this combinatorial problem as a classical multi-armed ba [More...]

Bio
Rahul Jain is the K. C. Dahlberg Early Career Chair and an Assistant Professor in the EE & ISE Departments at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA. He received his B.Tech from IIT Kanpur, and an MA in Statistics and a PhD in EECS from the University of California, Berkeley. Prior to joining USC in Fall 2008, he was at the IBM T J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY. He is a recipient of the NSF CAREER award in 2010, the ONR Young Investigator award in 2012, an IBM Faculty award in 2010, the James H. Zumberge Faculty Research and Innovation Award in 2009 and a Best paper award at The ValueTools Conference 2009. His interests span game theory and network economics, queueing theory, stochastic models, optimization and learning with applications to communication networks and power systems.


Thursday, November 15, 2012

A toy limit order book

Elena Yudovina

Host: Professor Alon Orlitsky

Abstract
I consider a Markov process inspired by a toy model of a limit order book. "Bid" and "ask" orders arrive in time; the prices are iid uniform on [0,1]. (I'll discuss some extensions.) When a match is possible (bid > ask), the highest bid and lowest ask leave the system. This process turns out to have surprising dynamics, with three limiting behaviours occurring with probability one. At low prices (< 0.21...), bids eventually never leave; at high prices (>0.78...), asks eventually never leave; and in between, the system "ought to" be positive recurrent. I will show how we can derive explicitly the limiting distribution of certain marginals for the middle prices; this makes it possible to extract the numerical values above from a 0-1 Law result.
Bio
http://www-personal.umich.edu/~yudovina/


Thursday, November 8, 2012

Modeling Random Access in Underwater Acoustic Networks

Paolo Casari

Host: Professor Alon Orlitsky

Abstract
The talk will review the properties of underwater acoustic communications and detail what makes them different with respect to terrestrial radio. A model will then be presented to evaluate the throughput and the transmission capacity of underwater networks; finally, the validation of the model using a ray tracing simulator will be discussed.
Bio
Paolo Casari received the PhD in Information Engineering in 2008 at the University of Padova, where he is currently a postdoctoral research fellow. He has been actively researching cross-layer protocol design patterns for MIMO ad hoc networks and wireless sensor networks. After a stay at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in 2007, he has been working on underwater acoustic networks, which have then become his main research interest. He has made several contributions in this field, centered on MAC and routing protocol design, simulations with realistic channel models, as well as “network simulation-friendly” channel characterization. He consistently serves as a reviewer and conference organizing committee member, and has been guest editor of the Hindawi Journal of Electronic and Computer Eng., special issue on "Underwater Communications and Networking."


Friday, November 2, 2012

Nov 2, 2012 Review


Abstract

Morning presentations
8:30 Continental breakfast
9:00 Welcome
9:05 Content-centric message forwarding in ad-hoc networks, Rene Cruz, UCSD
9:33 Ultra-low-power radios for miniaturized wireless systems, Patrick Mercier, UCSD
10:01 Cloud mobile media: opportunities and challenges, Sujit Dey, UCSD
10:29 Break
10:44 Qualcomm Research: Radios and a whole lot more, Charles Bergan, Qualcomm
11:12 Real-time communication over unreliable wireless channels, P.R. Kumar, Texas A&M
11:40 Device-to-device and relay-enhanced cellular architecture - Larry Milstein
12:00 Lunch


Afternoon project reviews
1:00 Switching-mode power amplifiers for multiband applications - Peter Asbeck
1:20 Enabling circuits for wideband wireless communications - Ian Galton
1:40 Towards enabling personalized and interactive video services - Sujit Dey
2:00 Next generation cognitive networks - Bhaskar Rao
2:20 Break
2:30 1-minute poster overviews
3:00 Posters and demos
3:50 Reception



Thursday, November 1, 2012

Lossy Compression for BigData: First Steps

Dr. Thomas Courtade

Host: Professor Alon Orlitsky

Abstract
Two key challenges in fitting BigData problems into a lossy compression framework are
(i) the selection of an appropriate distortion measure, and (ii) characterizing the performance of distributed systems. Inspired by real systems, like web search, which return a list of likely data entries indexed by likelihood, we study the "logarithmic loss" distortion function in a multiterminal setting, thus addressing both challenges. In particular, we characterize the
rate-distortion region for two (generally open) multiterminal source coding problems when distortion is measured under logarithmic loss.
In addition to the main results, I'll discuss applications to machine learning, estimation, and combinatorics.
Bio
Thomas Courtade received the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Michigan Technological University in 2007, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from UCLA in 2008 and 2012, respectively. In 2012, he was awarded a Postdoctoral Research Fellowship at the Center for Science of Information. He currently holds this position, and currently resides at Stanford University. His recent honors include a Distinguished Ph.D. Dissertation award from the UCLA Department of Electrical Engineering and a Best Student Paper Award at the 2012 International Symposium on Information Theory.


Friday, October 26, 2012

Towards Computational Sensing through large number of Networked Sensors

Prof. Lin Zhang

Host: Prof. Young-Han Kim

Abstract
Today, Internet users and networked sensors generate hundreds of gigabytes of data every minute, yet people are still feeling lost in an ocean of data, sometimes being starved of knowledge. In this talk, I will try to convince the audience, by sharing some experimental results in the systems the we developed and deployed in the past few years, that a surprisingly better understanding of the reality could be attained by performing state-of-art algorithms over large volume of data collected through networked sensors.


I will show two cases: one is a structure safety sensing system in the Tsinghua EE Hall and the other is a larger scale taxi-based sensing system in Beijing. Both cases show the power of cross-domain data correlation and analysis. Then, the idea of people-in-the-loop sensing will be presented by elaborating a smart building control experiment that is now conducted in the EE Halls on the Tsinghua and UC Berkeley campuses.
Finally, I will argue that a united theoretical fr [More...]

Bio
Lin Zhang received all his degrees from Tsinghua University in Beijing (B.Sc. '98, M.Sc. '01, Ph.D. '06) and is currently an associate professor at Tsinghua University and a visiting associate professor at Stanford University. His current research focuses on wireless sensor networks, distributed data processing, and information theory. He is a co-author of more than 40 peer-reviewed technical papers and five U.S. or Chinese patents applications. Lin and his team were also the winner of IEEE/ACM SenSys 2010 Best Demo Awards.




In 2006 Lin led a 2008 Beijing Olympic Stadium (the "Bird's Nest”) structural security surveillance project, which deployed more than 400 wireless temperature and tension sensors across the stadium's steel support structure and dome. The system adopted a flexible spectrum sensing and adaptive multi-hop routing algorithm to overcome strong radio interference and long-distance transmission channel-fading, and played a critical role in the construction of the st [More...]


Thursday, October 25, 2012

Three Open Problems in Network Communication

Michael Langberg

Abstract
In this talk I will discuss three natural open questions in the context of multi-source/ multi-terminal network communication via network coding. (a) What is the maximum loss in communication rate experienced from removing a single unit capacity edge from a given network? (b) What is the maximum loss in rate when insisting on zero error communication as opposed to vanishing decoding error? (c) What is the maximum loss in rate when comparing the communication of source information that is ``almost' independent to that of independent source information?




Recent results including intriguing connections between the three questions will be presented.




Based on joint work with Michelle Effros.
Bio
Michael Langberg is an Associate Professor in the Mathematics and Computer Science department at the Open University of Israel. Previously, between 2003 and 2006, he was a postdoctoral scholar in the Computer Science and Electrical Engineering departments at the California Institute of Technology. He received his B.Sc. in mathematics and computer science from Tel-Aviv University in 1996, and his M.Sc. and Ph.D. in computer science from the Weizmann Institute of Science in 1998 and 2003 respectively.




Prof. Langberg's research is in the fields of Information Theory and Theoretical Computer Science. His work focuses on the design and analysis of algorithms for combinatorial problems; emphasizing on algorithmic and combinatorial aspects of Information Theory, and on probabilistic methods in combinatorics.


Thursday, October 4, 2012

Queue-Size Scaling in Switched Networks

Devavrat Shah

Abstract
We consider a switched (queueing) network in which there are constraints on which queues may be served simultaneously; such networks have been used to effectively model input-queued switches, wireless networks and more recently data-centers. The scheduling policy for such a network specifies which queues to serve at any point in time, based on the current state or past history of the system. As the main result, we shall discuss a new class of online scheduling policies that achieve optimal scaling for average queue-size for a class of switched networks including input-queued switches. Time permitting, we shall discuss various exciting open questions in the domain of stochastic networks.




This is based on joint work with Neil Walton (Univ of Amsterdam) and Yuan Zhong (MIT).
Bio
Devavrat Shah is currently a Jamieson associate professor with the department of electrical engineering and computer science, MIT. He is a member of the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems (LIDS) and Operations Research Center (ORC). His research focus is on theory of large complex networks which includes network algorithms and statistical inference. He has received 2008 ACM Sigmetrics Rising Star Award and 2010 Erlang Prize from the Applied Probability Society of INFORMS. He currently serves as an associate editor of Operations Research, Queueing Systems and IEEE Transactions on Information Theory.


Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Long Range Dependent Markov Models

Barlas Oguz

Abstract
We discuss countable state Markov chains as a flexible class of models for long range dependent sources. We state sufficient conditions under which an instantaneous function of a long range dependent Markov chain has the same Hurst index as the underlying chain. We discuss several applications of the theorem in the fields of information theory, queuing networks, and finance.
Bio
Barlas Oguz graduated from Bilkent University in 2007 where he completed his undergraduate studies in Electrical Engineering. He went on to continue his studies at the University of California Berkeley, where he is currently finalizing his PhD. His current research interests include probability theory and stochastic processes with applications in information theory and communication networks. Specifically, he is developing new models for network traffic and information sources that exhibit heavy dependence over time and investigating the consequences of this dependence in contrast to more traditional models.


Friday, June 15, 2012

On q-ary Antipodal Matchings and Applications

Gadiel Seroussi

Abstract
We define a q-ary antipodal matching to be a perfect matching in the bipartite graph with vertices corresponding to words of length m over the integer alphabet Q={0,1,...,q-1} wherein the left and right vertices are those with respective component sums greater and smaller than m(q-1)/2, and wherein two
vertices are connected by an edge if one of the corresponding words dominates the other. We present two different constructions of efficiently computable q-ary antipodal matchings. We then show how such matchings can be used for encoding arbitrary data into n x n arrays over the alphabet Q all of whose row and column sums are at most n(q-1)/2. Such encoders might be useful for mitigating parasitic currents in a next generation memory technology based on crossbar arrays of resistive devices.




(Joint work with Erik Ordentlich and Ronny Roth.)
Bio
Dr. Gadiel Seroussi received his B.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering, and his M.Sc. and D.Sc. degrees in Computer Science from Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel, in 1977, 1979, and 1981,respectively. From 1981 to 1987 he was with the faculty of the Computer Science Department at Technion. During the 1982--1983 academic year, he was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY. From 1986 to 1988 he was a Senior Research Scientist at Cyclotomics Inc., Berkeley, CA. Since 1988 he has been with Hewlett--Packard Laboratories, Palo Alto, California, where he founded the Information Theory Research Group and was its director until 2005. During the 2005--2006 academic year, he was Associate Director of the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute in Berkeley, California. Since 2004, he has held a joint appointment in Computer Science and Electrical Engineering at Universidad de la Rep'ublica, Montevideo, Uruguay. He is a co-auth [More...]


Monday, June 11, 2012

Data Compression and Secrecy

Prakash Narayan

Abstract
The multiterminal data compression problem of attaining omniscience and the secrecy problems of secret key generation and secure computing might suggest contrasting communication requirements. In fact, they are innately coupled. In this talk, we discuss connections between omniscience attainment by multiple terminals which observe separate but correlated signals, and secret key generation and secure function computation by those terminals, all in a distributed manner. Simple constructive schemes that are motivated by these connections will be described for elementary models.
The talk is based on joint works with Imre Csiszár, Sirin Nitinawarat, Himanshu Tyagi and Chunxuan Ye.
Bio
Prakash Narayan received the Bachelor of Technology degree in Electrical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras in 1976, and the M.S. and D.Sc. degrees in Systems Science and Mathematics, and Electrical Engineering, respectively, from Washington University, St. Louis, MO, in 1978 and 1981.
He is Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Maryland, College Park, with a joint appointment at the Institute for Systems Research. His research interests are in multiuser information theory, communication theory, communication networks, cryptography, and information theory and statistics.
He has held visiting appointments at ETH, Zurich; the Technion, Haifa; the Renyi Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest; the University of Bielefeld; the Institute of Biomedical Engineering (formerly LADSEB), Padova; and the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore.
Narayan has served as Associate Editor for Shannon Theory for the IEEE Transact [More...]


Monday, April 30, 2012

On Source-Channel Communication in Networks

Jun Chen

Abstract
This talk is divided into two parts. In the first part of this talk, I will present several results on the optimality and approximate optimality of the source-channel separation architecture for lossy source coding in general networks. These results are shown without explicitly characterizing the achievable joint source-channel coding distortion region or the achievable separation-based coding distortion region. The second part of this talk is devoted to the problem of sending two correlated vector Gaussian sources over a bandwidth matched two-user scalar Gaussian broadcast channel, where each receiver wishes to reconstruct its target source under a covariance distortion constraint. I will present a lower bound on the optimal tradeoff between the transmit power and the achievable reconstruction distortion pair. The derivation of this lower bound is based on a new bounding technique which involves the introduction of appropriate remote sources. Furthermore, it is shown that this lower b [More...]

Bio
Jun Chen received the B.E. degree with honors in
communication engineering from Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai, China, in 2001 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical
and computer engineering from Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, in 2004
and 2006, respectively. He was a Postdoctoral Research Associate in
the Coordinated Science Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, from 2005 to 2006, and a Postdoctoral Fellow at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY, from 2006 to 2007. He is currently an Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. He holds the Barber-Gennum Chair in Information Technology. His research interests include information theory, wireless communications, and signal processing. He received several awards for his research, including the Josef Raviv Memorial Postdoctoral Fellowship (2006), the Early Research Award from the Province of Ontari [More...]


Monday, April 2, 2012

On the Development of Tools for System Design

Alessandro Pinto, Systems Department, United Technologies Research Center

Host: Lorenzo Coviello

Abstract
The design of large systems is divided into vertical refinement steps. The system is also partitioned into sub-systems that are designed in isolation and integrated in the prototyping and testing phase. Many design projects, commercial and military, incur in cost and schedule overruns mainly caused by errors discovered during testing. The correction of such errors typically requires undergoing long re-design cycles. The use of an appropriate methodology supported by tools can help avoiding these problems.
In this talk, we present a language for the contract-based specification of components and product families and we show how architectures can be checked for correctness. The language allows capturing static properties that are the ones typically considered in the preliminary design of systems. We then present methods to design and verify systems when dynamics and uncertainty are taken into account.

Given the expressiveness required to capture realistic systems, analysis methods d [More...]

Bio
Alessandro Pinto is a researcher in the Systems Department at the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) Inc., Berkeley, California. His research interests are in the area of computer aided design for cyber-physical systems with particular emphasis on autonomous systems. He received a Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences from the University of California at Berkeley in 2008, and a M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering in 2003 from the same University. He holds a Laurea degree from the University of Rome “La Sapienza”. From 1999 to 2001, he was a consultant at Ericsson Lab Italy in Rome, Italy, working on the design of system-on-chips and wireless access networks.


Wednesday, December 7, 2011

Photonics based Telemedicine Technologies toward Smart Global Health Systems

Aydogan Ozcan, Bioengineering Department, California NanoSystems Institute, UCLA

Host: Mehmet Parlak

Abstract
Today there are more than 5 billion cell-phone users in the world, and the majority of these cellphones are being used in the developing parts of the world. This massive volume of wireless phone communication brings an enormous cost-reduction to cellphones despite their sophisticated hardware and software capabilities. Quite importantly, most of these existing cellphones are also already equipped with advanced digital imaging and sensing platforms that can be utilized for various health monitoring applications. This impressive advancement is one of the central building blocks of the emerging fields of Telemedicine and Wireless Health. The success of these fields will surely increase the quality of health care and reduce the insurance costs in developed countries like the United States, however, their most important and immediate impact will be to provide breakthrough technological solutions to various Global Health Problems including infectious diseases such as HIV, TB or malaria. Spec [More...]

Bio
Dr. Aydogan Ozcan received his Ph.D. degree at Stanford University Electrical Engineering Department in 2005. After a short post-doctoral fellowship at Stanford University, he is appointed as a Research Faculty Member at Harvard Medical School, Wellman Center for Photomedicine in 2006. Dr. Ozcan joined UCLA in the summer of 2007, where he is currently an Associate Professor leading the Bio- and Nano-Photonics Laboratory at the Electrical Engineering and Bioengineering Departments. Dr. Ozcan holds 17 issued patents and another 12 pending patent applications for his inventions in nanoscopy, wide-field imaging, lensless imaging, nonlinear optics, fiber optics, and optical coherence tomography. Dr. Ozcan is also the author of one book and the co-author of more than 200 peer reviewed research articles in major scientific journals and conferences. In addition, Dr. Ozcan is the founder and a member of the Board of Directors of Microskia Inc., and is a member of the program committee of SPIE P [More...]


Friday, November 4, 2011

Nov 4, 2011 Review






Agenda


Friday, May 27, 2011

Cascades in Networks and Aggregate Volatility

Prof. Alireza Tahbaz-Salehi

Host: Lorenzo Coviello

Abstract
one of the main features of all modern economies is the very high level of interconnectivity between different firms and sectors, as a firm's production depends on a rich array of intermediate goods, as well as financial and other services provided by different sectors in the economy. In this talk, I provide a general framework for the study of cascade effects created by such interconnections. Focusing on a competitive multi-sector economy where firms use outputs of other sectors as intermediate goods for production, I show how structural properties of the network determine whether aggregate volatility vanishes as the number of sectors increases, as well as the rate at which this happens. Our main results characterize how aggregate volatility is related to first- and higher-order interconnections between different sectors. Such a characterization enables us to determine which supply networks are more conducive to propagation of technological shocks across the economy, and thus, lead to [More...]

Bio
Alireza Tahbaz-Salehi is a Post-doctoral Associate at the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems (LIDS), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he works with Professors Daron Acemoglu and Asuman Ozdaglar. Alireza received his Ph.D. in Electrical and Systems Engineering from University of Pennsylvania in 2009, under the supervision of Professor Ali Jadbabaie. In Fall 2011, he will be joining the Columbia Graduate School of Business as an Assistant Professor of Decision, Risk and Operations.
His research interests include theoretical and applied microeconomics, social and economic networks, decision theory and game theory.


Tuesday, April 19, 2011

Reducing Beamformer Selection Complexity in Multiple Antenna Systems

Prof. David J. Love, Purdue University

Host: Eitan Yaakobi

Abstract
beamforming is a critical spatial processing technique employed in a variety of multiple antenna wireless applications. A major issue is properly designing the beamforming vector, especially when faced with imperfect channel knowledge assumptions. In this talk, we deal with two specific beamforming design scenarios. The first addresses the problem of choosing a beamforming vector using finite rate feedback with a large number of antennas. Because the beamformer search complexity grows exponentially with the number of antennas, we propose new reduced complexity techniques based on trellis coded line packing. The second addresses the problem of beamforming in mmWave applications. In this scenario, maintaining a large beamforming gain is critical to prevent link outage. However, it is impractical to sound the entire channel matrix. To deal with this we propose, a new multiphase beamforming alignment algorithm.
Bio
David J. Love received the B.S. (with highest honors), M.S.E., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Texas at Austin in 2000, 2002, and 2004, respectively. Since August 2004, he has been with the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, where he is now an Associate Professor. Dr. Love currently serves as an Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing and the IEEE Transactions on Communications. He has also served as a guest editor for special issues of the IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications and the EURASIP Journal on Wireless Communications and Networking. His research interests are in the design and analysis of communication systems, MIMO array processing, and array processing for medical imaging. Dr. Love is a Senior Member of the IEEE. Along with co-authors, he was awarded the 2009 IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology Jack Neubauer Memorial Award for the best systems pape [More...]


Friday, April 8, 2011

MILLIMETER-WAVE MOBILE BROADBAND – UNLEASHING THE 3–300 GHz SPECTRUM FOR MOBILE COMMUNICATION

ZHOUYUE PI : Director, Samsung R&D Center, Dallas, Texas
FAROOQ KHAN : Senior Director, Samsung R&D Center, Dallas, Texas

Abstract
Almost all cellular mobile communications -- including first generation analog systems, second generation digital systems, third generation WCDMA systems and fourth generation OFDMA systems -- use an Ultra High Frequency (UHF) band of radio spectrum with frequencies in the range of 300MHz-3GHz. This band of spectrum is becoming increasingly crowded due to spectacular growth in mobile data services. The portion of the RF spectrum above 3GHz has been largely unexploited for commercial mobile applications. In this tutorial, we discuss propagation and device technology challenges associated with this band, as well as its unique advantages such as spectrum availability and small component sizes for mobile applications. We also present a practical millimeter-wave mobile broadband (MMB) system that can achieve multi-Gbps data communications in an urban environment.

Download presentation


Tuesday, March 8, 2011

Emerging ADCs

Prof. Un-Ku Moon, Oregon State University

Host: Nevena Rakuljic

Abstract
Most analog IC designers and students are drawn to ADCs. While some ADC realizations have had a lasting impact, examples including pipelined ADCs with digital redundancy, flash ADCs with folding and interpolation, and multi-bit delta-sigma modulators with dynamic element matching, there are many more recent and emerging ADC design techniques that are receiving much attention and also gaining momentum in some areas. Many of these ideas are showered with doubts and honest criticism. However, we may also be entering a new era where a few of these developments would help resolve the tough submicron scaling challenge that analog designers face today. This talk will summarize and ponder the impact of a few selective as well as random slices of these emerging ADC designs.
Bio
Prof. Un-Ku Moon has been with the Oregon State University since 1998. Prior to that, he was with Bell Labs 1988-1989 and 1994-1998. He received a bachelor's degree from the University of Washington, a master's degree from Cornell University, and a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Prof. Moon's past work includes highly linear and tunable continuous-time filters (Ph.D. work), telecommunication circuits including timing recovery and analog-to-digital converters (a bit of Ph.D. work), frequency synthesizers, and switched-capacitor circuits. His current research interests include high-frequency switched-capacitor filters, low-voltage switched-capacitor circuits, high-resolution and oversampling data converters, and highly linear continuous-time filters.


Monday, February 28, 2011

Workshop on SILICON AND SYSTEMS IN PACKAGE TECHNOLOGIES FOR RF TRANSMISSION MODULES.

Dr. Antonino Scuderi, ST Microelectronics

Host: Arline Allen

Abstract
This workshop will present the latest market trends, design concepts and developments in RF module/RFIC power amplifiers as well as base-stations covering the RF system requirements for multi-mode and multiband power amplifiers and FEM from a silicon-maker perspective.
Despite the market domain of GaAs and InGap HBT for RF PAs, silicon-based solutions are mature enough to compete against other non-silicon technologies and could be used widely in handheld cell-phones exploiting some new developments in device technologies and circuit solutions, as well as system-level improvements. Challenges remain in terms of output power, efficiency, linearity, mismatch handling, bias and control techniques, and multimode and multiband capability. All of them will be analyzed and, after a brief review of basic concepts, the workshop will present and discuss technology and circuital mitigation techniques, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of CMOS and silicon-based power amplifiers. New devi [More...]

Bio
Antonino Scuderi was born in Catania, Italy, in 1972. He received the Laurea degree in electronics engineering (cum laude) from the University of Catania, Catania, Italy, in 1997. From 1999 to 2005, he was with the Radio Frequency Advanced Design Center (RF-ADC), a joint research center supported by the University of Catania and STMicroelectronics, where he managed the STMicroelectronics RF PA advanced design team. In 2006 he received the Ph.D. degree in electronics and automation engineering at the University of Catania. Since 2006 he has been with STMicroelectronics, where he served as manager of RF power developments until 2009. Currently, he is the senior manager of microsystems developments in the fields of power RF, power compounds, flexible electronics and healthcare. He is the author of 38 scientific papers and holds eight industrial patents.


Thursday, February 17, 2011

Microelectronics: A Changing Playing Field with Many R&D Opportunities.

Dr. Andreia Cathelin, ST Microelectronics

Host: Arline Allen

Abstract
The semiconductor business landscape evolution
ST overview and strategy
R&D focus areas
Bio
Andreia Cathelin (M’04) started her electronic studies at the Polytechnic Institute of Bucarest, Romania and graduated from the Institut Supérieur d’Electronique du Nord (ISEN), Lille, France in 1994. In 1998, she received the Ph. D. degree from IEMNISEN, Lille, France regarding the work on a fully-integrated BiCMOS low power – low voltage FMRDS receiver.
From 1997 till 1998, she was with Info Technologies, Gradignan, France, working on analog and RF communications design. Since 1998, she has been with ST Microelectronics, Crolles, France, now in the Technology R&D, Central CAD and Design Solutions, Innovation & External Research design team.
Andreia is a senior design expert and her major fields of interest are RF and mmW systems for wireless communications, MEMS devices co-integration and SOI technologies. She is a member of the Technical Program Committee of ISSCC, VLSI Symposium on Circuits and ESSCIRC. She is member of the experts’ team of the AERES (French Evaluation A [More...]


Friday, February 4, 2011

Band Edge Filters: Characteristics and Performance in Carrier and Symbol Synchronization.

Prof. fred harris, San Diego State University

Host: Arline Allen

Abstract
It is amazing how many papers on radio systems, networks, error correcting codes, and related topics contain a version of the sentence “Let’s assume the system is synchronized.” Alright, let’s assume the system is synchronized. But I have a few questions: Who did it? How did they do it? Who will do it in the next decades as many of us retire from the field? An important one is; where are they acquiring the skills required to negotiate and navigate the future physical layers? This presentation deals with one aspect of synchronization, the frequency and phase alignment the digital down converter sinusoid with the frequency and phase of the suppressed carrier underlying the received modulated signal.
The second tier processing task performed by a radio receiver is that of estimating the vector of unknown parameters associated with its received signal. These estimators fail when the received signal has a significant unknown frequency offset. Hence, when a frequency offset does exi [More...]

Bio
I hold the Signal Processing Chair of the Communication Systems and Signal Processing Institute at San Diego State University where since 1967 I have taught courses in Digital Signal Processing and Communication Systems. I hold 17 patents on digital receiver and DSP technology and lecture throughout the world on DSP applications. I consult for organizations requiring high performance, cost effective DSP solutions. I am an adjunct member of the IDA-Princeton Center for Communications Research.
I have written over 170 journal and conference papers, the most well known being my 1978 paper “On the use of Windows for Harmonic Analysis with the Discrete Fourier Transform”. I am the author of the book Multirate Signal Processing for Communication Systems and I have contributed to a number of other books on DSP applications including the “Source Coding” chapter in Bernard Sklar’s 1988 book, Digital Communications and the “Multirate FIR Filters for Interpolation and Resampling” [More...]


Friday, January 28, 2011

Reverse Engineering the Web and How to Make Money from it.

Dr. Behnam Rezaei, NetSeer CTO and co-founder

Host: Ehsan Ardestanizadeh

Abstract
the Internet has enabled the emergence of global-scale information networks, such as the world wide web and the various social media and ecommerce transaction portals. These overlay networks provide an unprecedented venue for information sharing, collaboration, and competition for ideas and attention. For the first time, information scientists, sociologists, economists, and engineers have the opportunity to investigate and manipulate a purely organic information system, as mysterious and complex as any physical system. It provides a rich platform for both analysis and design. A fertile collaborative field has developed involving information theory, thermodynamics and statistical physics, and social sciences. We will discuss recent joint work on the distillation of knowledge from large scale processing of content on the web that lead to foundations of NetSeer Inc., an internet advertisement company in silicon valley with strategic partnerships with Google and Yahoo!. We will overview cu [More...]

Bio
Behnam A. Rezaei received his B.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Sharif, and UCLA, respectively. His research topics include mining and modeling of complex systems and information networks. he currently leads NetSeer's team in the design and implementation of its technological innovations as Founder/CTO and is the primary inventor of the company's ten patent applications to date. Prior to founding NetSeer, Behnam was a lead researcher on several projects in spam filtering, identification of the structure and dynamics in large-scale biological networks, and the development of P2P network clients.


Saturday, January 1, 2011

On Equivalence, Dependence, and Delay: Results from a Simple Tool for Information Theory

Michelle Effros

Abstract
The expansion of information theory from the study of very small networks to the understanding of extremely large networks is often viewed as both critically important and insurmountably difficult. Nonetheless, many general properties of large networks can be derived using very simple tools. This talk focuses on a reduction strategy borrowed from CS theory, exploring a few simple applications and their implications for understanding the nature of noise, the impact of dependence, and the consequences of delay for reliable communications in large (and small) communication networks.
Bio
Michelle Effros received the B.S. degree with distinction in 1989, the M.S. degree in 1990, and the Ph.D. degree in 1994, all in electrical engineering from Stanford University. During the summers of 1988 and 1989 she worked at Hughes Aircraft Company, researching modulation schemes, real-time implementations of fast data rate error-correction schemes, and future applications for fiber optics in space technology.




She is currently Professor of Electrical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology; from 1994 - 2000 she was Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering; and from 2000 - 2005, Associate Professor. Her research interests include information theory, data compression, communications, pattern recognition, speech recognition, and image processing.




Professor Effros received Stanford's Frederick Emmons Terman Engineering Scholastic Award (for excellence in engineering) in 1989, the Hughes Masters Full-Study Fellowship in 1989, the National Science Foundation G [More...]